Audience Ratings: Radio, Television, and Cable

By Hugh Malcolm Beville Jr. | Go to book overview

relevant to one-way, entertainment-driven commercial programming, which in addition to broadcast, cable, and time-shift VCRs includes cable substitutes-- SMATV, MMDS, and DBS.

Over the years the methods and the accuracy of ratings systems have frequently been challenged. However, the integrity, objectivity, and fairness of the people delivering the audience numbers have rarely been questioned. This is the legacy of Crossley, Hooper, Nielsen, Roslow, and Seiler. These pioneers set ethical and professional standards that have been carried on by their successors. May we see the imprint of their principles on those services which may emerge to measure electronic media audiences in the future.


NOTES
1.
Few people were as successful as David Sarnoff not only in foreseeing the future but in making it happen. Some examples are his 1915 vision of mass radio audiences receiving music, news events, and sports results over a "Radio Music Box," his founding of NBC to provide quality radio service, his foresight in 1929 in backing Vladimir Zworykin to successfully pursue electronic television, his determination to launch commercial television at the New York World's Fair in 1939, and his indefatigable pioneering and $200 million commitment to compatible electronic color (now used in 90 percent of U.S. households) in the face of vicious competitive attacks.
2.
"IRTS Brings Big Names Together," Broadcasting, February 6, 1984, p. 52, a report on the twelfth annual faculty/industry and college conference of the International Radio and Television Society.
3.
"Enhancement--Next TV Set Revolution," Television Digest, March 19, 1984, p. 11.
4.
Sandra Salmans, "Cable Operators Take a Bruising," The New York Times, March 4, 1984, Section 3, p. 1.
5.
"TCI Buys Pittsburgh System," Television Digest, March 26, 1984, p. 6.
6.
The implication that there is any cable service but pay cable will disappear along with that artificial distinction.
7.
Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau, New York.
8.
Hugh M. Beville Jr., "VCR Penetration: Will It Surpass Cable by 1990?" Television/Radio Age, July 9, 1984, p. 27.
9.
Ibid., p. 110.
10.
Advertising Age (April 9, 1984) characterized the RCA move as "a hammerblow" to the entire videodisc market.
11.
Jill McNiece, "Cable Ops Place Bets on Multichannel MDS," Multi- channel News, December 12, 1983, p. 40.

-292-

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Audience Ratings: Radio, Television, and Cable
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1 - Radio Services-- Pre-Tv (1930-1946) 1
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Radio Services--Post-Tv (1946-1984) 28
  • Notes 59
  • 3 - Television Services (1946-1984) 62
  • Notes 81
  • 4 - Rating Methodologies: A Comparative Examination 83
  • Notes 129
  • 5 - Quantitative Versus Qualitative Ratings 131
  • Notes 157
  • 6 - Cable Ratings (1979-1984) 160
  • Notes 183
  • 7 - Using Ratings Data 185
  • Notes 217
  • 8 - Ratings: Servant or Master? 219
  • Notes 240
  • 9 - Government Intervention 242
  • Notes 256
  • 10 - What We Have Learned: 1930-1984 258
  • Notes 270
  • 11 - A Look to the Future 271
  • Notes 292
  • Appendix A Ratings Basics: Terms, Calculations, and Relationships 294
  • Sources 299
  • Appendix B Offices and Services of Principal Syndicated Ratings Companies Operating on A National Basis 300
  • Appendix C Audience Measurement Highlights U.S. Total Population 304
  • Appendix D Methodological Studies and Assessments 315
  • Introduction 315
  • Bibliography 345
  • Index 351
  • About the Author 363
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