Keats's Endymion: A Critical Edition

By John Keats; Stephen T. Steinhoff | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Endymion may well be the least read of Keats's major poems. Nor is it difficult to see why this seemingly diffuse, mawkish and formless work has put off all but the most devoted readers. And yet as the only poem of epic intent Keats managed to complete, it is an essential text for comprehending the full extent of his poetic vision. As Harold Bloom remarks, it "exposes the complete anatomy of a great mythical structure and is our fullest revelation of the reach and power of Keats's poetic mind." 1 Since no editor to date has attempted to articulate that anatomy, I have here provided a cross-section of the major criticism on Endymion, with particular emphasis on readings that clarify its mythical structure. I have also included the more traditional type of annotation, aiming to place the poem in the context of its literary relatives and the body of Keats's work. For this I am indebted to previous annotated editions, especially Ernest de Selincourt The Poems of John Keats, Douglas Bush Selected Poems and Letters of John Keats, and Miriam Allott The Poems of John Keats. 2

I wish to thank Professor Jack Stillinger for permission to use his definitive text of Endymion. 3 Readers interested in the textual variants--which I have cited only when an important critical point is at issue--are referred to his excellent textual edition for authoritative discussions. I would also like to acknowledge a debt of gratitude to Professors John E. Grant and Oliver Steele of the University of Iowa, without whose advice and encouragement this edition would not have been completed. Needless to say, whatever inspiration they provided, the errors in taste and judgment I must acknowledge as my own.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Keats's Endymion: A Critical Edition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction Biographical Background 1
  • Notes 50
  • Endymion: Text and Notes 57
  • Preface 58
  • Book I 59
  • Book II 84
  • Book II 109
  • Book II 135
  • Notes to Book I 160
  • Notes to Book II 197
  • Notes to Book II 218
  • Notes to Book II 234
  • The Original Dedication and Preface 259
  • Review in the Champion 261
  • Croker's Attack in the Quarterly Review 265
  • Reynold's Reply to Croker in the Examiner 270
  • Patmore's Review in the London Magazine 276
  • Bibliography of References Cited 293
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.