Keats's Endymion: A Critical Edition

By John Keats; Stephen T. Steinhoff | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Harold Bloom, The Visionary Company ( Garden City: Doubleday, 1961),387.
2
Ernest de Selincourt, ed., The Poems of Jobn Keats ( New York: Dodd, Mead, 1905); Douglas Bush, ed., Selected Poems and Letters of John Keats ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1959); Miriam Allott, ed., The Poems of John Keats ( London: Longman, 1970). Of the three, only Allott cites critical works, but her citations are far too few and arbitrary to be at all representative.
3
Jack Stillinger, ed., The Poems of Jobn Keats ( Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1978).
4
Edward Le Comte [ Endymion in England ( New York: King's Crown Press, 1944), 1521 notes the "slight and elusive" (barren) quality of the myth--its inability to bear the weight of many words. Neverthless, it seems ideally suited to Keats's poetic sensibility. The action of the story, perhaps better described as pictorial passion, is slow, almost static, as Phoebe still gazes on the sculptured shepherd dreaming in a quiet bower of marmoreal sleep. This is the aesthetic state of exquisite receptivity Keats repeatedly evokes in Endymion. Moreover, Endymion's association with the sun and its setting (see Le Comte, pp. 11 and 32) allows for endless symbolic speculation (i.e., the sun sleeping in the Cave of Night, Apollo presiding over a western elysium, etc.). There is also an obvious personal allegory in this story of a beautiful youth beloved of the gods, who, dying young, wins an immortality with Jove.
5
See Endymion I. 39-57 and accompanying note.
6
Letter to Haydon of May 10, 1817 (I,141). Murry [ Keats and Sbakespeare ( London: Oxford University Press, 1925), 351, describing Keats's creative excitement at this time, believes "Shakespeare, poetry and the sea became knit together in a single thought and feeling. Each worked upon the other, till the ferment of his inward excitement became unbearable and Keats fled to the company of his brother Tom at Margate."
7
See Letter to Taylor and Hessey of May 16, 1817 (I,146-7) and Endymion I.133-4. Bate [ John Keats ( Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 1965), 180] believes these nervous trips "were not solely a result of his struggle to overcome inertia and create a new mementum. He was trying to express those thoughts that, as his later writing shows, were most urgent." Bate seems to suggest that since the first 400 lines of the poem anticipate many of the "thoughts" of images of Keats's later poetry, they essentially are the poem, the remaining lines being mere filler or after- thought. This is a radical instance of what happens to Endymion when judged by Keats's mature verse.

-50-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Keats's Endymion: A Critical Edition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction Biographical Background 1
  • Notes 50
  • Endymion: Text and Notes 57
  • Preface 58
  • Book I 59
  • Book II 84
  • Book II 109
  • Book II 135
  • Notes to Book I 160
  • Notes to Book II 197
  • Notes to Book II 218
  • Notes to Book II 234
  • The Original Dedication and Preface 259
  • Review in the Champion 261
  • Croker's Attack in the Quarterly Review 265
  • Reynold's Reply to Croker in the Examiner 270
  • Patmore's Review in the London Magazine 276
  • Bibliography of References Cited 293
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.