Keats's Endymion: A Critical Edition

By John Keats; Stephen T. Steinhoff | Go to book overview
follow beneath the horizon into the underworld of Bk.II. It may also suggest, since it served as the setting of Endymion's dream-visions, that Endymion is to continue his quest for the realization of his dreams, even as he appears to renounce them.
990-2. The dramatic frame-effect of the closing lines of Lycidas.

Notes to Book II
143. A prologue in defense of love against history. K. rejects history, as Bloom3 (389) says, "because it cannot affect poetic consciousness, which depends altogether on love." Frye6 (37) points out that what K. and the Romantics reject is not so much "history as the social process of which actual history is the record. The rejection of history in this sense is an anti-mimetic tendency, a rejecting of social reality in favor of a social ideal." Frye6 (142-3) speaks of the two sense of "identity" in K. ("identity-as" and "identity-with") as representing "the two poles of Endymion's cosmos, the worlds of Circe and Phoebe . . ." Circe's domineering, ego-centered world of action and history is precisely the opposite of Phoebe's world of "poets and lovers, who identify themselves with what they make or love." Wasserman (57) emphasizes K.'s sense of historical events imprisoned "in a context of space and time. They belong to mutability and have not been lifted by a giant into an immortality, or pursued with an ardor until they are 'unconfined' by space, time and identity; they are 'real things,' not ethereal things, symbols." Wasserman supports his statement with an important quotation from K.'s essay "On Kean in 'Richard Duke of York,' " where K. speaks of the poetry of Shakespeare's historical plays as

for the most part ironed and manacled with a chain of facts, and cannot get free; it cannot escape from the prison house of history, nor often move without our being disturbed with the clanking of its fetters. The

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Keats's Endymion: A Critical Edition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction Biographical Background 1
  • Notes 50
  • Endymion: Text and Notes 57
  • Preface 58
  • Book I 59
  • Book II 84
  • Book II 109
  • Book II 135
  • Notes to Book I 160
  • Notes to Book II 197
  • Notes to Book II 218
  • Notes to Book II 234
  • The Original Dedication and Preface 259
  • Review in the Champion 261
  • Croker's Attack in the Quarterly Review 265
  • Reynold's Reply to Croker in the Examiner 270
  • Patmore's Review in the London Magazine 276
  • Bibliography of References Cited 293
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 306

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.