Keats's Endymion: A Critical Edition

By John Keats; Stephen T. Steinhoff | Go to book overview
his body and . . . the sun's rays . . . filtered through the sea above him." But the obvious reference is to Diana's cooler moon-light, which governs the tides and which Endymion is following under the sea.
1023. Gittings (146) claims the line "has the sudden sharp isolated echo of the great single lines with which Dante finishes each canto" and "does for Endymion what the last line of Inferno, Canto 26, in Cary's version, did for Ulysses, 'And over us the booming billow clos'd.'"

Notes to Book III
1-21. K.'s attack on the reactionary regimes of the day. Evert (140) regards "the distinctive characteristic here as the inward- turning of self-love. Those whose high positions lay upon the obligation of service to their fellow men too often gratify their own desires through exploitation of their fellows." As Bloom3 (388) remarks, K. here is invoking the regality of the four elements while denouncing all political regalities. Later in the book Circe's self-absorbed tyranny is renounced in favor of Neptune's regality of the sea.
7-8. Fire-branded foxes . . . tipe-eared hopes. Refers to one of Samson's practical jokes (see judges 15.4-5). But in the present context of tyranny destroying "ripe-eared hopes," K. may have had in mind King Lear V,iii,22-3: "He that parts us shall bring a brand from heaven / And fire us hence like foxes."
10. delight: clothed; an archaism.
20-1. The Chaldean storm-god Rammon was worshipped as a god of oracles.
23-39. Wasserman (50) interprets in the context of the silent "Grecian Urn" as "forces outside the range of mutability which

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Keats's Endymion: A Critical Edition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Introduction Biographical Background 1
  • Notes 50
  • Endymion: Text and Notes 57
  • Preface 58
  • Book I 59
  • Book II 84
  • Book II 109
  • Book II 135
  • Notes to Book I 160
  • Notes to Book II 197
  • Notes to Book II 218
  • Notes to Book II 234
  • The Original Dedication and Preface 259
  • Review in the Champion 261
  • Croker's Attack in the Quarterly Review 265
  • Reynold's Reply to Croker in the Examiner 270
  • Patmore's Review in the London Magazine 276
  • Bibliography of References Cited 293
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