Dimensions of State Mental Health Policy

By Christopher G. Hudson; Arthur J. Cox | Go to book overview

Foreword

In the United States, mental health policy, and particularly the care of persons with serious mental illness, traditionally has been a local and state responsibility. With growth and urbanization in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, states and localities built institutions for the care and custody of the seriously mentally ill. As these systems grew, staffing and maintenance became significant components of state budgets. By 1955, there were almost 559,000 residents of state and county institutions and over 800,000 yearly inpatient episodes.

In the 1960s, the nation implemented a broad public health and community care ideology based on a variety of unconfirmed premises about the nature of mental illness, the potentials of prevention, and the advantages of care in the community. The development and support of community mental health centers ( CMHCs) was to be the major vehicle for implementation. The federal program in its efforts to develop a national network of CMHCs bypassed state mental health authorities and dealt directly with local community institutions. National policy makers became the advocates and Instruments for a radically new conception of public responsibility in managing mental illness. The states continued with their traditional responsibilities of maintaining mental hospitals. The new CMHCs contributed little to the care of the severely mentally ill once they returned to the community. Instead they focused their efforts on new types of clients.

The new community ideology and the expansion of the boundaries of care for mental illness were facilitated by other trends. The growth of health insurance and increased coverage for mental illness provided more opportunities for care and for development of new treatment settings. Most dramatic was the expansion of psychiatric treatment in general hospitals in both specialized psychiatric units and in beds scattered throughout medical and other units. Also, in the late 1960s, Medicare stimulated the rapid expansion of nursing home beds, and the Medicaid program provided strong incentives to states to shift patients from mental institutions completely funded by the states to nursing home beds where funding would be shared.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dimensions of State Mental Health Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 304

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.