Exporting the American Model: The Post-War Transformation of European Business

By Marie-Laure A. Djelic | Go to book overview

economic sociology. It clearly points to a number of fruitful research paths, both at an empirical and at a theoretical level, and the main conclusions bring along new questions. Opportunities to build upon this work are thus quite numerous but for now they must remain another story.


Notes
1.
Quoted in Berghahn ( 1986: 332).
2.
Le Défi américain was the title of a book published by Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber in 1967 which had a significant impact in France at the time. Servan-Schreiber was essentially arguing that Western European industrial firms would never stand up to the American challenge if they did not increasingly come to resemble their American counterparts, adopting American structural arrangements, organizational patterns, and modes of management.
3.
I have argued earlier that this redefined economic space was itself an institutional creation prompted essentially by geopolitical and political considerations.
4.
See McKenna ( 1997) for an interesting case study focusing on the McKinsey consulting firm and its role in this second wave of transfer.
5.
"'Les désillusions politiques du Nord, région la plus riche d'Europe'", Le Monde ( April 11, 1996).
6.
Cohenet al. ( 1972). The episode in American business history when the business community takes hold of the holding company device to bypass the antitrust legislation is clearly an example of a chance encounter between problem and solution.

-282-

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