The Bondman: An Antient Storie

By Philip C. Massinger; Benjamin Townley Spencer et al. | Go to book overview

Notes

TITLE PAGE

The title page of the second quarto is the same as that of the first with the following exceptions: Lines 6, 7, and 8 have a different arrangement; Phillip is spelled Philip in the second edition; there is a change in the printer's device; the advertisement of the publishers becomes either that of Harrison or of Blackmore. See Introduction II, EDITIONS.

The company of Lady Elizabeth was formed in 1611 by John Townsend and Joseph Moore under the patronage of the Princess, who was then fifteen years old. After March 1613 the company, amalgamated with the Queen's Revels, was known as Princess Elizabeth's Company. As a consequence of Elizabeth's becoming Queen of Bohemia in November 1619, her players were often distinguished by the title of the Queen of Bohemia's Company. After a series of amalgamations and rather unfortunate dealings with Henslowe they are spoken of as acting at the Cockpit or Phoenix in Drury Lane in 1622. Here they continued to act, with short intervals at the court and in the provinces, until perhaps May of 1625, the time of the increase of the plague. Then Queen Henrietta's Men occupied the Cockpit, and the theater of Queen Elizabeth's Company is not known. The company seems to have disbanded in 1632. Cf. J. T. Murray , English Dramatic Companies, I, 243-64.

The Cockpit or Phoenix was erected possibly in 1616, as Stow Annales and Camden Annals of James I both speak of it under the year 1617 as newly erected. It was a small private theater, but it was little superior to the average public theater, and largely owing to its disreputable surroundings did not attract the best audiences. It was dismantled in 1649 and last used in 1664. See W. J. Lawrence, The Elizabethan Playhouse and other Studies, pp. 16 ff.


DEDICATION

Philip Herbert, Earl of Montgomery and fourth Earl of Pembroke, was the younger brother of William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke. Born October 10, 1584, he was about a year younger than Massinger.

Soon after James I ascended the throne Philip became a favorite, and was created Earl of Montgomery June 4, 1605. Although he was superseded by Robert Carr, Earl of Somerset, and by George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, as the King's minion, "yet was he ever in the King's good

-161-

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The Bondman: An Antient Storie
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Textual Symbols 75
  • Notes to Text on Page 76 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 77 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 80 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 81 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 82 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 83 *
  • Actvs I. 82
  • Notes to Text on Page 84 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 85 *
  • Actvs I. 84
  • Notes to Text on Page 86 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 87 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 88 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 89 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 90 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 91 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 92 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 93 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 94 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 95 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 96 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 97 *
  • Actvs Ii. 97
  • Actvs Ii. 98
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 104
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 113
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 115
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 118
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes to Text on Page 125 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 126 *
  • Actvs Ii. 126
  • Actvs Ii. 127
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 129
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes to Text on Page 132 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 133 *
  • Actvs Ii. 133
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes to Text on Page 135 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 136 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 137 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 138 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 139 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 140 *
  • Notes to Text on Page 143 *
  • Actvs V. 143
  • Actvs Ii. 147
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Actvs Ii. 151
  • Actvs Ii. *
  • Notes 161
  • Appendix I Influences 257
  • Appendix Ii Printers and Booksellers of the Quartos 260
  • Bibliography 262
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