Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview

diplomatic representative or other agent of His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, duly authorized to receive the same, seven million two hundred thousand dollars in gold. The cession of territory and dominion herein made is hereby declared to be free and unincumbered by any reservations, privileges, franchises, grants, or possessions, by any associated companies, whether corporate or incorporate, Russian or any other, or by any parties except merely private individual property-holders; and the cession hereby made conveys all the rights, franchises, and privileges now belonging to Russia in the said territory or dominion, and appurtenances thereto.


ARTICLE VII.

When this convention shall have been duly ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, on the one part, and, on the other, by His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington within three months from the date hereof, or sooner if possible.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this convention, and thereto affixed the seals of their arms.

Done at Washington the thirtieth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven.

[SEAL.] WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

[SEAL.] EDOUARD DE STOECKL.


No. 64. Third Reconstruction Act July 19, 1867

THE difficulties encountered by the military commanders in enforcing the acts of March 2 and 23, 1867, especially in regard to the oath prescribed in the second of the two acts, led to the issue on June 20, through the Adjutant General's office, and with the approval of all the members of the Cabinet except Stanton, of instructions setting forth the view of the Executive as to the meaning and scope of the acts in question. From the standpoint of Congress, the instructions were a serious limitation on the effectiveness of the acts.

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