Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview

contrive means then and there to prevent the execution of an act entitled "An act making appropriations for the support of the army for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1868, and for other purposes," approved March 2, 1867, and also to prevent the execution of an act entitled "An act to provide for the more efficient government of the rebel States," passed March 2, 1867; whereby the said Andrew Johnson, President of the United States, did then, to wit, on the 21st day of February, 1868, at the city of Washington, commit and was guilty of a high misdemeanor in office.

[Agreed to, 109 to 32, 48 not voting.]


No. 67. Fourth Reconstruction Act March 11, 1868

A BILL "to facilitate the restoration of the late rebel States" was introduced in the House, December 5, 1867, by Ashley of Ohio, and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. On the 18th the bill was withdrawn in favor of a bill of similar purport, substantially identical with the act as passed, brought forward by Thaddeus Stevens. The latter bill passed the House the same day by a vote of 104 to 37, 47 not voting. The bill was not at once considered in the Senate. The rejection, February 4, 1868, of the proposed constitution of Alabama, however, when "the registered voters refrained from voting upon the question of ratification in sufficient numbers to reduce the vote to several thousand less than half the registration," hastened action. A substitute for the House bill was reported February 17, and on the 26th was agreed to, the vote being 28 to 6. The House, by a vote of 96 to 32, 61 not voting, concurred. March 11 the bill became law by the ten days rule.

REFERENCES. -- Text in U.S. Statutes at Large, XV, 41. For the proceedings see the House and Senate Journals, 40th Cong., 2d Sess., and the Cong. Globe. The text of Ashley's bill is in the Globe, December 18, House proceedings. On elections in the Southern States see House Exec. Doc. 291, 40th Cong., 1st Sess.; annual report of the Secretary of War, 1868.

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