Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview

President of the United States, who shall lay the report before Congress.

SEC. 3. And be it further resolved, That the said commissioners shall serve without compensation, except the payment of expenses . . .: Provided, That nothing in these resolutions contained shall be held, understood, or construed as committing Congress to the policy of annexing the territory of said republic of Dominica.

APPROVED, January 12, 1871.


No. 91. Supplementary Act to enforce the Fifteenth Amendment
February 28, 1871

A BILL to amend the act of May 31, 1870, commonly known as the "Force Bill," was introduced in the House, January 9, 1871, by John C. Churchill of New York, and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary. February 15 a substitute offered by Bingham of Ohio was agreed to with amendments, and the bill passed, the final vote being 144 to 64, 32 not voting. The Senate passed the bill on the 24th without amendment by a vote of 39 to 10, 25 not voting. The act was further supplemented by a provision of the civil appropriation act of June 10, 1872 [No. 95].

REFERENCES. -- Text in U.S. Statutes at Large, XVI, 433-440. For the proceedings see the House and Senate Journals, 41st Cong., 3d Sess., and the Cong. Globe.

An Act to amend an Act approved May thirty-one, eighteen hundred and seventy, entitled "An Act to enforce the Rights of Citizens of the United States to vote in the several States of this Union, and for other Purposes."

Be it enacted . . ., That section twenty of the . . . [act of May 31, 1870] . . . shall be, and hereby is, amended so as to read as follows: --

"SEC. 20. And be it further enacted, That if, [at] any registration of voters for an election for representative or delegate in the Congress of the United States, any person shall know-

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