Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview

nickel, to be composed of three-fourths copper and one-fourth nickel, and the alloy of the one-cent piece shall be ninety-five per centum of copper and five per centum of tin and zinc, in such proportions as shall be determined by the director of the mint. The weight of the piece of five cents shall be seventy-seven and sixteen-hundredths grains, troy; of the three-cent piece, thirty grains; and of the one-cent piece, forty-eight grains; which coins shall be a legal tender, at their nominal value, for any amount not exceeding twenty-five cents in any one payment.

SEC. 17. That no coins, either of gold, silver, or minor coinage, shall hereafter be issued from the mint other than those of the denominations, standards, and weights herein set forth.


No. 97. Act regarding United States Notes
and National Bank Currency
June 20, 1874

A BILL "to amend the several acts providing a national currency and to establish free banking" was reported in the House, January 29, 1874, by Maynard of Tennessee, from the Committee on Banking and Currency, as a substitute for various bills previously referred to the committee. April 10 a substitute amendment was agreed to by a vote of 149 to 95, 46 not voting, and the next day the amended bill passed the House, the final vote being 129 to 116, 45 not voting. A substitute was reported in the Senate May 6, and was agreed to with various amendments on the 14th, the vote on the passage of the bill being 25 to 19. The House, by a vote of 70 to 164, disagreed to the Senate amendments. June 13 the report of a conference committee proposing the House substitute was agreed to by the Senate by a vote of 32 to 23, but rejected by the House by a vote of 108 to 146, 35 not voting. A second report was accepted June 20, in the House by a vote of 221 to 40, 28 not voting, in the Senate by a vote of 43 to 19.

REFERENCES . -- Text in U.S. Statutes at Large, XVIII, 123-125. For the proceedings see the House and Senate Journals, 43d Cong., 1st Sess., and the Cong. Record. An abstract of the original House bill is in the Record for January 29; the text of the Senate substitute, ibid., May 6. For Sherman opinion of the act see his Recollections, I, 508.

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