Select Statutes and Other Documents: Illustrative of the History of the United States, 1861-1898

By William MacDonald | Go to book overview

representations, or promises, forbid the payment by any postmaster to said person or company of any postal money-orders drawn to his or its order, or in his or its favor, or to the agent of any such person or company, whether such agent is acting as an individual or as a firm, bank, corporation, or association of any kind, and may provide by regulation for the return to the remitters of the sums named in such money-orders. But this shall not authorize any person to open any letter not addressed to himself. The public advertisement by such person or company so conducting any such lottery, gift enterprise, scheme, or device, that remittances for the same may be made by means of postal money-orders to any other person, firm, bank, corporation, or association named therein shall be held to be prima facie evidence of the existence of said agency by all the parties named therein; but the Postmaster-General shall not be precluded from ascertaining the existence of such agency in any other legal way."

APPROVED, September 19, 1890.


No. 124. Immigration and Contract Labor
March 3, 1891

AN act of March 3, 1875, forbade the entrance into the United States of "persons who are undergoing a sentence for conviction in their own country of felonious crimes other than political or growing out of or the result of such political offenses, or whose sentence has been remitted on condition of their emigration." By an act of August 3, 1892, a duty of fifty cents, to be paid by the master, owner, agent or consignee of the vessel, was imposed for each alien entering the United States by water. Convicts, insane or feeble-minded persons, and persons liable to become a public charge were forbidden to land, and foreign convicts, "except those convicted of political offenses," were to be returned, the expense of returning immigrants who were denied entrance to be borne by the owners of the vessels in which they came. A bill further to amend the laws relating to immigration and contract labor was introduced in the House, February 12, 1891, by William D. Owen of Indiana, and passed on the 25th by a vote of 125 to 48. The Senate substituted the House

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