The Transformation of Criminal Justice, Philadelphia, 1800-1880

By Allen Steinberg | Go to book overview

Appendix

The following tables illustrate many of the points made in the text concerning the number and disposition of cases in Philadelphia's courts. Several also provide information on the number and types of prison commitments and inmates and other details of criminal justice activity.

Unless otherwise noted, the data came from four manuscript sources. Data on pretrial commitments to, and discharges from, prison are from the Philadelphia County Prison Daily Occurrence Docket. The information in this docket consists of the name of the person committed (from which I derived the prisoner's gender), the date of commitment, the charge, the person authorizing the commitment, the date of discharge, the sentence (when applicable), and the name of the person authorizing, or the reason for, the discharge. I took a 1 percent sample of the entries in this docket for every even numbered year between 1800 and 1880 and a 10 percent sample for the simple process of calculating percentages of charges.

Data on the courts of record are from the Docket Books of the Philadelphia County Court of Quarter Sessions and the Philadelphia City Mayor's Court. The information in these dockets consists of the defendant's name, the charge, the grand jury disposition, plea, verdict, sentence, and the name of the presiding judge. For the quarter sessions, I took a 5 percent sample for 1800, 1810, 1815, 1820, 1825, and every even numbered year from 1830 to 1880. For the mayor's court, I took a 20 percent sample for the same years through 1836, the final year of this court's operation.

Many of the entries in the court dockets are incomplete, but they sometimes included additional information that I could make use of, such as information on the placing of costs on prosecutors. When there was no mention of the costs, I assumed that they were absorbed by the county. Infrequent charges could not be meaningfully analyzed by themselves, so I combined them to the general categories of morals, order, serious personal and property crime, and minor property crime.

Data on the characteristics of convicts in the county prison are from the Philadelphia County Prison Convict Description Docket. Information in this docket consists of the convict's name, race, sex, age, place of birth, occupation, crime, sentence, and number of times sentenced to prison. I took a 20

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Transformation of Criminal Justice, Philadelphia, 1800-1880
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables vi
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction: the Greatest Luxury of All 1
  • Part I the Duality of Criminal Justice 11
  • 1. Courtrooms and Cases 13
  • Part Ii the World of Private Prosecution 35
  • 2. the Aldermen and Primary Justice 37
  • 3. the Courts of Record 56
  • 4. the Weakness of Court Officials 79
  • 5. Politics and Private Prosecution, 1800-1850 92
  • Part III the Rise of State Prosecution 117
  • 6. the Origins of Police Authority 119
  • 7. Consolidation and Compromise 150
  • Part Iv the Decline of Private Prosecution 169
  • 8. the Impact of Consolidation 171
  • 9. the Transformation of Primary Justice 196
  • Epilogue 224
  • Appendix 233
  • Notes 251
  • Bibliography 307
  • Index 323
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.