Toxic Debts and the Superfund Dilemma

By Harold C. Barnett | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The passage of Superfund into law on the eve of Ronald Reagan's election as president of the United States set in motion two diametrically opposed forces: a legislative mandate to commit billions of dollars to the cleanup of hazardous waste sites and a White House-interpreted mandate to get government off the backs of the people. Their opposition produced the Sewergate scandal of 1982-83 and kindled my desire to write a political economy of Superfund.

In the early 1980s I was researching government control of illegal corporate behavior. Some of my colleagues perceived a clear tendency for government to take a tougher stand against law violations by large corporations. The progress of the deregulatory movement, gaining strength since the mid-1970s, suggested that their optimism was misplaced. In this context, Superfund appeared a perfect vehicle to gauge the force and direction of government involvement in market relationships and to address a question of increasing relevance as the 1980s progressed: Is it possible to successfully pursue environmental goals in a political economic system that is biased toward the interests of capital and under an administration that unabashedly advocates that bias as in the public interest?

It has taken almost a decade to investigate and write a story of Superfund that spans the Reagan and Bush administrations. As of this writing, there is a new president in the White House and a new EPA administrator. Congress is again addressing Superfund reauthorization issues. The reader might then ask whether this book has relevance to environmental protection under a new administration and a redesigned law. Is it of more interest to academics than to those who must contend with the real world of Superfund cleanup? My best answer to these questions is to state the conclusion of the book: The failure of Superfund to promote an efficient and equitable response to hazardous waste site threats is rooted in an inherent conflict over economic and environmental priorities. This conflict encompasses and goes beyond self-interested political battles. Rather, it emerges, on the one hand, from the fact that a concerted and successful effort to place the burden of cleanup on those corporations responsible for hazardous waste generation and disposal has far-reaching implications for the operation and viability of our capitalist economy. On the other hand, to write off hazardous waste site risks as overstated and shrink the program or to

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Toxic Debts and the Superfund Dilemma
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Toxic Debts - Chapter 1 1
  • Production, Disposal, and Contamination - Chapter 2 9
  • Conflict, Regulation, and the State - Chapter 3 31
  • Congress and the Reagan Epa - Chapter 4 51
  • Superfund and the States - Chapter 5 87
  • Epa Regions: Implementing Superfund - Chapter 6 121
  • Roots of Superfund Failure - Chapter 7 159
  • Redsigning Superfund - Chapter 8 195
  • Ending a Decade of False Starts - Chapter 9 237
  • Solving the Superfund Dilemma - Chapter 10 273
  • Notes 283
  • Bibliography 305
  • Index 317
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 334

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.