Woman's World/Woman's Empire: The Woman's Christian Temperance Union in International Perspective, 1880-1930

By Ian Tyrrell | Go to book overview

Preface

More so than in the case of purely national histories, a comparative and international study demands the help of other scholars. I have been especially fortunate. The thanks issued in prefaces often seem ritualistic or clichéd, but this case truly underlines the value and the reality of cooperation in the international academic community. I beg forgiveness from those I have inadvertently failed to mention.

Pride of place goes to a number of Australian libraries, upholding the traditions of higher learning in these times of utilitarian education: Fisher Library at Sydney University; the unsurpassed collections on Australian and Pacific history at the David Scott Mitchell Library, Sydney; and the University of New South Wales Library. In relation to the latter institution, it has been my pleasure to be associated especially with Pam O'Brien and the staff of the Social Sciences and Humanities Library, who obtained so much material by purchase and on interlibrary loan.

Other libraries provided valuable and often indispensable collections. The University of Toronto Library assisted in the microfilming of important periodical sources on the Canadian WCTU. No historian of the international women's movement can afford to neglect the holdings of the Fawcett Library, City of London Polytechnic. Invaluable in my case were the papers of Josephine Butler. Material drawn from the Castle Howard Archives, Yorkshire, England, with the courteous and knowledgeable assistance of Archivist Eeyan Hartley, is used with kind permission of the Honorable Simon Howard. Martin Ridge and the Huntington Library made possible investigations into the history of the nineteenth-century women's movement on a sojourn there during my sabbatical leave in 1982. For New Zealand, thanks to Massey University for collecting the published WCTU sources in a single microfiche collection. Other valuable collections used were at the Schlesinger Library; Widener Library, Harvard University; the Bancroft Library, University of California; the University of California, Los Angeles; the New York Public Library; Boston Public Library; Smith College; the Swarthmore College Peace Collection; National Archives, Washington, D.C.; and the Lilly Library, Indiana University. No librarians, however, provided more generous assistance than those at the Sherrod Library, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, Tennessee, where the literary remains of Jessie Ackermann are stored. Without the resources of the

-xi-

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Woman's World/Woman's Empire: The Woman's Christian Temperance Union in International Perspective, 1880-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations xv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Origins of Temperance Internationalism 11
  • 3 - The World's Wctu 35
  • 4 - Bands of Ribbon White Around the World 62
  • 5 - In Dark Lands 81
  • 6 - Sisters, Mothers, and Brother-Hearted Men 114
  • 7 - Alcohol and Empire 146
  • 8 - Peace as A Way of Life 170
  • 9 - A Fatal Mistake? 191
  • 10 - Women, Suffrage, and Equality 221
  • 11 - Women and Equality 242
  • 12 - Prohibition and the Perils of Cultural Adaptation 255
  • Epilogue - Divergent Meanings of the World's Wctu 285
  • Appendix 291
  • Notes 295
  • Index 365
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