Woman's World/Woman's Empire: The Woman's Christian Temperance Union in International Perspective, 1880-1930

By Ian Tyrrell | Go to book overview

7
Alcohol and Empire

A much-neglected theme in the history of European expansionism is the connection between imperial power and alcohol. Western liberal historians have expended disproportionate energy refuting the shadowy thesis of a purely economic imperialism concerned with the export of capital or the search for markets. At the same time, the context of both power and morality within which the late nineteenth-century antiimperialist debate took shape has been given inadequate attention. Unlike present-day ideologues in the debate over imperialism, late nineteenth-century liberals and social reformers dwelt not on economics per se but on how economics was intertwined with the extension of imperial power, with all of its connotations of class and racial hierarchy. Despite British pretensions to free trade and an open market, the foundations of Western imperialism rested, even in the case of Britain, upon an assertion of governmental and military strength that underpinned the safety and prosperity of traders and missionaries and that both expressed and reinforced class distinctions of domestic origin by providing suitable careers for the sons of the upper middle class.1

The neglect of power and morality is curious and inexcusable, since, at least in the much-discussed case of John Hobson's Imperialism, an unmistakable moral dimension is present. For Hobson, imperialism was a parasitic accretion upon the political economy that depended upon the extension of malevolent influences for its special favors. Empirical analysis of the economic interests involved should not lose sight of this spirit of moral distaste and of Hobson's deeper awareness that the interests of trade and finance that imperialism served to advance were interconnected with the sociological and political aspects of imperial rule. In this respect, at least, Hobson was correct, even if his analysis was flawed in many other ways.2 The European impact was much more complex than an economic one, and the cultural, religious, social, and psychological aspects of Western domination of less fortunate peoples must be addressed in any competent historiography. Among issues of concern to those critical of imperialism was the involvement of Western governments and traders in the sale of opium and alcohol. Because the trade in these commodities provided valuable governmental revenues and supplemented the profits of private enterprise as well, the

-146-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Woman's World/Woman's Empire: The Woman's Christian Temperance Union in International Perspective, 1880-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Abbreviations xv
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - Origins of Temperance Internationalism 11
  • 3 - The World's Wctu 35
  • 4 - Bands of Ribbon White Around the World 62
  • 5 - In Dark Lands 81
  • 6 - Sisters, Mothers, and Brother-Hearted Men 114
  • 7 - Alcohol and Empire 146
  • 8 - Peace as A Way of Life 170
  • 9 - A Fatal Mistake? 191
  • 10 - Women, Suffrage, and Equality 221
  • 11 - Women and Equality 242
  • 12 - Prohibition and the Perils of Cultural Adaptation 255
  • Epilogue - Divergent Meanings of the World's Wctu 285
  • Appendix 291
  • Notes 295
  • Index 365
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 381

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.