Writing North Carolina History

By Jeffrey J. Crow; Larry E. Tise | Go to book overview

Index
A
Abernethy, Thomas P., 69-70
Academic freedom, 176
Adams, Charles Kendall: disparages Williamson's history, 21
Adams, Herbert Baxter, 40
Agrarian revolt, 160. See also Populists
Agriculture, 159-60; and effect of slavery, 129; and impact of Civil War, 146-47
Albemarle County, 18, 20
Alden, John R., 61
Alderman, Edwin A., 54
Alderman, Ernest H., 46
Alexander, C. B., 55
Alexander, Thomas B., 141
Alexander, Will, 201
Allcott, John V., 34
Alston, Willis, 109; attacks William R. Davie in congressional race, 87
America . . .: one of the earliest general works on America, 10
American Education: The Colonial Experience, 1607-1783, 66
American Geography. . . , 19
Amy, Thomas, 12
Andrew Jackson and North Carolina Politics, 120
Andrews, Alexander Boyd, 188
Andrews, Charles M., 17
Anglican church: and loyalists, 58; disestablishment of, 67
Ante-Bellum North Carolina: A Social History, 65, 93, 125
Antifederalism: attends fiat finance, 71
Antifederalists: in Revolution, 39; treated fairly by McRee, 56; oppose Constitution, 72-74
Antimission movement: in Jacksonian South, 91-92
Appalachian State University, 201
Arminianism, 91
Arnett, Alex M., 178-79
Arnett, Ethel Stephens, 194
Art in North Carolina, 198
Ash, Thomas, 12
Ashe, Samuel A'Court, xvi, 40, 77, 95, 124, 143; first to publish study based on Colonial Records, 28-29; fascinated by antebellum progress, 114-15; sympathizes with secessionists, 134-35; appreciates dilemma of Jefferson Davis, 138
Ashe, William S., 115
Atlas of North Carolina, 206
Avery, Waightstill, 108
Aycock, Charles Brantley, 162-63

B
Bagley, Dudley Warren, 187
Bagwell, William, 210
Bailey, Josiah W., 164, 170; grows conservative during New Deal, 176
Ballagh, J. C., 40
Ballots and Fence Rails: Reconstruction on the Lower Cape Fear, 145
Bancroft, George, 24
Baptists, 154, 176; and autonomous congregations, 89; and schism over

-225-

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