Individual Training in Our Colleges

By Clarence F. Birdseye | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
RECAPITULATION OF CONDITIONS IN OUR EARLIER COLLEGES

THE historical review already made of the genesis and growth of our earlier colleges causes some points to stand out clearly.

These colleges were regarded as means and not as ends in themselves. The ends sought were paramountly great in the eyes of the colonists -- the means were necessarily very imperfect. The ends were the conversion of every student to a "lively faith in Christ"; an education in divinity, the ancient languages, logic, mental and moral philosophy, public speaking, correct and elegant writing, and the lower mathematics; and thus the development of clean, strong, moral character, according to the standards of the day, in every student; and so the spread of God's Kingdom. With these great ends in view we may gravely question whether the early fathers would not have thought it a sacrilege to have made the college an end in itself.

They were means for high ends.

There were constant and persistent efforts to regulate the private and personal lives of the unsophisticated boys, who, for the most part, composed the body of the students. Individual Training was dominant. Social conditions, the poverty of the institutions and the small numbers of faculty and students made this possible. The colleges in themselves were not in any respect imposing. On the contrary they were poverty-stricken in the highest degree: always begging for more, yet owing their teachers, and constantly in need of help from the public treasuries as well as from private donors. The colleges were almost perfect exponents of their times and customs -- narrow, bigoted, ready to split hairs and fight to the finish on doctrinal questions. The very fact that they were ready to force their theories and doctrines on the other man, even at the expense of his life if need be, made it certain that they would bring up their boys in the way that -- according to the elders'

Individual Training dominant.

Colleges narrow, bigoted, but trained their students well.

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Individual Training in Our Colleges
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 442

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.