New Architecture and City Planning: A Symposium

By Paul Zucker | Go to book overview

PUBLIC HEALTH PLANNING

By MARGARET WITTER BARNARD

General education of all children has been accepted in this country as a prerequisite to an intelligent citizenry capable of carrying forward a democratic form of government. In the same way general health protection and opportunity for all the people must be accepted as fundamental for a healthy citizenry--one which in time of war will be able to maintain strong forces and equally in time of peace be able to carry forward the development of a strong country. Therefore Public Health must be considered as a public utility and so planned for. Public Health today is so considered by its own leaders. But to the people at large, the consumers of this commodity and those who ultimately pay for its production, public health is too often considered as one or another type of free clinic service rendered to low income groups. Public health will move forward in the future only as each taxpayer understands the application of health protection and opportunity to himself, his own family and his community. Only from such understanding will come two requisites--sufficient financial support for a sound, well conducted public department of health services, and the acceptance of personal responsibility. The values to an urban community of such recognized public health functions as safe control of the milk, food and water supplies and environmental sanitation are recognized, but are taken for granted. Yet the actions of thousands of

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