The Plays of David Garrick: A Complete Collection of the Social Satires, French Adaptations, Pantomimes, Christmas and Musical Plays, Preludes, Interludes, and Burlesques - Vol. 1

By Harry William Pedicord; Fredrick Louis Bergmann et al. | Go to book overview

He's an old offender, and I think we have a power to transport him.

FIRST JUSTICE. I don't know that. We must have a care of informations above, Mr. Cramp. We can't be too wary. A burnt child, you know. Call in the Head Borough. Call in Joseph Harrow.

CLERK. Joseph Harrow! Come into court.

THIRD JUSTICE. What think you, Brothers, of setting our hands to his10
pass and having him whipped from constable to constable?

FIRST JUSTICE. But where must we pass him to, Mr. Justice Spindle? This fellow is a vagabond, 'tis true. But he is son to nobody, setvant to nobody, belongs to nobody, comes from nowhere and is going to nowhere. And we none of us, no, none of us, know nothing at all about him.

[(3) Harlequin and Constables] Enter Constable P.S.

FIRST JUSTICE. Well, Mr. Constable, where is your prisoner?

CONSTABLE. He's without. And, please your Worships, I wish we were well rid of him. For, under favor, I don't think he's of this world.

He is certainly something, as I may say, of the magical order20
about him.

FIRST JUSTICE. Ay, how so?

CONSTABLE. Why there's Simon Clodby of Gander Green says as how this blackamoor man has cut off a tailor's head and sewed it on again.

SECOND JUSTICE. Did you ever hear the like. Why, he has cut off all your heads, I think.

CONSTABLE. I think we are all in some danger, aye, and your Worships, too. For I heard him say myself that he could cut off all your Worships' heads and no harm done neither.

FIRST JUSTICE. He'll cut off our heads, will he? We'll lay him by the30
heels first. Bring him before us. He'll cut off our heads, quotha? And now we have got him.

Enter Harlequin and Constable P.S.

FIRST JUSTICE. Let us first examine the prisoner. I hear, Sir, that you have been doing a great deal of mischief about this country.

HARLEQUIN. Yes. A great deal.

FIRST JUSTICE. Very well. He confesses it. Set that down, Clerk. And I hear that you cut off people's heads.

HARLEQUIN. Yes, to cure the toothache. Is your Worship troubled with it?

THIRD JUSTICE. You impudent vagabond! How dare you talk to the40
court so? Did you tell this honest constable here that you would cut off our heads?

-213-

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The Plays of David Garrick: A Complete Collection of the Social Satires, French Adaptations, Pantomimes, Christmas and Musical Plays, Preludes, Interludes, and Burlesques - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Introduction xxi
  • Lethe; Or, Esop in the Shades - A Dramatic Satire 1740 1
  • Epilogue 33
  • The Lying Valet 1741 35
  • Dramatis Personae 37
  • Scene 1. Gayless' Lodgings. Enter Gayless and Sharp. 37
  • Scene [ii]. Melissa's Lodgings. Enter Melissa and Kitty. 45
  • Scene [ii]. Melissa's Lodgings. Enter Melissa and Kitty. 45
  • Scene [ii]. Melissa's Lodgings. Enter Melissa and Kitty. 51
  • Epilogue 67
  • Miss in Her Teens: Or, the Medley of Lovers - A Farce 1747 69
  • Advertisement 71
  • Prologue 72
  • Dramatis Personae 74
  • Act I. Scene I. 74
  • Scene [ii.] Changes to A Chamber. 83
  • Act Ii. Scene I. 83
  • Epilogue 103
  • Lilliput 1756 - A Dramatic Entertainment 105
  • Advertisement 107
  • Prologue 110
  • Dramatis Personae 112
  • Epilogue 130
  • The Male-Coquette; Or, Seventeen-Hundred Fifty-Seven 1757 133
  • Advertisement 135
  • Prologue 136
  • Dramatis Personae 138
  • Act I. [scene I.] [a Hall in Sophia's House.] 138
  • [scene Ii.] 146
  • Act Ii. [scene I.] 146
  • Act Ii. [scene I.] 155
  • Act Ii. [scene I.] 162
  • The Guardian A Comedy 1759 169
  • Advertisement 171
  • Dramatis Personae 172
  • Act I. Scene I. A Hall in Mr. Heartly's House. 172
  • Act II 173
  • Act II 188
  • Harlequin's Invasion; Or, A Christmas Gambol 1759 199
  • Dramatis Personae 201
  • Act I 201
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 205
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 205
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 213
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 216
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 221
  • The Enchanter; Or, Love and Magic A Musical Drama 1760 227
  • Advertisement 229
  • Persons 230
  • Act I. Scene I. 231
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 233
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 233
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 234
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 235
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 235
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 235
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 238
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 240
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 240
  • The Farmer's Return from London . - An Interlude 1762 243
  • Advertisement 245
  • Persons of the Interlude 246
  • The Clandestine Marriage - Acomedy 1766 253
  • Advertisement 255
  • Prologue 256
  • Dramatist Personae 258
  • Act I. [scene I.] 258
  • Scene Ii. Plain Chamber 268
  • Act Ii. [scene I.] 268
  • [scene Ii.] 281
  • [scene Ii.] 281
  • [scene Ii.] 291
  • [scene Ii.] 298
  • Act Iv. Scene I. 298
  • [scene Ii.] 306
  • [scene Ii.] 306
  • [scene Ii.] 317
  • [scene Ii.] 320
  • Epilogue 332
  • Neck or Nothing A Farce 1766 337
  • Advertisement 339
  • Dramatis Personae 340
  • Act I. [scene I.] 340
  • Scene II 347
  • Scene II 355
  • Scene II 363
  • Scene II 364
  • List of References 373
  • Commentary and Notes 377
  • Index to Commentary 431
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