The Southern Strategy Revisited: Republican Top-Down Advancement in the South

By Joseph A. Aistrup | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER 1. SEEDS OF CHANGE
1.
In some instances Louisiana is included in the analyses. However, because state legislative information on Louisiana is not available for the entire period, in most instances Louisiana is excluded.
2.
It is important to note that Nixon's victory in 1972 reflected the rejection of McGovern as much as the success of the Southern Strategy ( Bass and De Vries 1976).
3.
One of the ironies of this debate is the controversy involving the definition of realignment ( Trilling and Campbell 1980, 3-20): What may appear to be a realignment to Strong and Seagull, who use aggregate data, may not appear to be one to Beck and Converse, who use individual-level data. Users of individual-level data generally agree with Petrocik's definition of realignment--a remapping of partisan attachments among a group or groups ( 1981). Users of aggregate data scan for broad changes in voting patterns in geographic areas ( Trilling and Campbell 1980, 3-20).

Key's distinction between a critical and secular realignment adds further complexity to this debate. Critical realignments are abrupt in nature and sometimes result in a new majority party ( Key 1955). Secular realignments are gradual, occurring over a large number of elections ( Key 1959). Thus there are problems on two fronts when attempting to chart Southern political change: First, how should a possible realignment be detected? Second, how should it be classified?

4.
Beck envisioned that his theory applied not only to the South, but also to the rest of the nation. His arguments are applied to the South.

CHAPTER 2. THE RHETORIC OF THE SOUTHERN STRATEGY
1.
Carmines and Stimson ( 1989) believe the events of 1964 caused a dynamic realignment.

-263-

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The Southern Strategy Revisited: Republican Top-Down Advancement in the South
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures, Tables, and Maps viii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Section 1 3
  • Chapter 1 Seeds of Change 5
  • Chapter 2 the Rhetoric of the Southem Strategy 18
  • Chapter 3: Colonizing the South 65
  • Chapter 4: Contesting and Winning Elections 90
  • Section 2 111
  • Chapter 5: Ideology 113
  • Chapter 6 Intraparty Coalitional Politics: the Coleman Paradox 143
  • Chapter 7 the Redistricting Explanation 167
  • Chapter 8: Democratic Incumbency 183
  • Chapter 9: Top-Down Advancement 211
  • Chapter 10 the Southern Strategy and Top-Down Advancement: Conclusion 243
  • Appendix 1 Interviews 249
  • Appendix 2 Demographic Clusters 251
  • Appendix 4 Pool Time-Series Design 258
  • Appendix 5 the Measurement of Republican Subnational Advancement 260
  • Notes 263
  • Bibliography 270
  • Index 287
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