Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1925-1993: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook

By Karlyn Kohrs Campbell | Go to book overview

EMILY GREENE BALCH

( 1867-1961), Nobel Peace laureate, citizen of the world

LYNNE DERBYSHIRE

Emily Greene Balch was the second U.S. woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. ( Jane Addams was the first.) She sought and shaped for herself a life of expanding influence in an era when women's lives were still very much defined by domestic concerns. She was an educator, and she was an active social worker; indeed, she helped to develop the concept of social work. Of greatest significance, she dedicated her life to helping create an international perspective that would eliminate the causes of war through her involvement with the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

As a speaker and writer, she expressed her pragmatic idealism through images of unity and sought consensus in potentially conflicting points of view. Rhetorically, she used a very personal tone and presented complex concepts and issues in terms that were familiar to her audiences. She enlivened her ideas with concrete examples and vivid descriptions drawn from the world of nature. Her ideals were embodied in her words as they were expressed in her actions. Her public words echoed her private persuasive efforts, some of her efforts having greater impact than her words. For example, she helped shape Wilson's Fourteen Points at the end of World War I.


BACKGROUND

Emily Greene Balch appeared almost destined for her international career. Each stage of her life led logically to the next, each preparing her for her future role. Born in Jamaica Plains, Massachusetts, Balch was one of six children of an old New England family, many of whom were social activists. Her father, perhaps the most important influence on her life, was secretary to U.S. Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts, an abolitionist who was also committed to peace activism. As Sumner's secretary, Francis V. Balch was clerk to the Senate

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Women Public Speakers in the United States, 1925-1993: A Bio-Critical Sourcebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Ti-Grace Atkinson 1
  • Emily Greene Balch 25
  • Clare Boothe Luce 40
  • Rachel Louise Carson 72
  • Margaret Chase Smith 90
  • Mary Daly 120
  • Jessie Daniel Ames 134
  • Andrea Dworkin 175
  • Geraldine Ann Ferraro 190
  • Helen Gahagan Douglas (1900-1980), Member of Congress, Defender of Liberal Democratic Principles, Advocate for Women's Equity 207
  • Margaret Higgins Sanger 238
  • Helen Adams Keller (1880-1968), Advocate for the Blind, Socialist, and Feminist 254
  • Aimee Kennedy Semple Mcpherson 273
  • Catharine A. Mackinnon 287
  • Robin Evonne Morgan 306
  • Pauli Murray 319
  • Leonora O'Reilly 331
  • Frances Perkins 345
  • Charlotte Perkins Gilman 359
  • Anna Eleanor Roosevelt 379
  • Patricia Scott Schroeder 395
  • Phyllis Stewart Schlafly 409
  • Fannie Lou Townsend Hamer 424
  • Alyce Faye Wattleton 436
  • Ann Willis Richards 452
  • Martha Wright Griffiths 465
  • Index 477
  • About the Contributors 489
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