The Rise of Modern Religious Ideas

By Arthur Cushman McGiffert | Go to book overview

PREFACE

THIS volume is based upon the Earl Lectures, given before the Pacific Theological Seminary, at Berkeley, California, in September, 1912.

A number of years ago, in response to the request of Doctor James M. Whiton, I promised to write a book on the "Antecedents of Modern Theology," as one of a series dealing with modern religious thought. Circumstances delayed its preparation, and, when the invitation was received to give the Earl Lectures, it seemed wise to take a kindred theme as the subject of the course. With the gracious approval, both of the seminary authorities and of the editor of the series, the present volume, which contains the substance of the lectures, but in a different form and considerably enlarged, appears as the first of the series on modern religious thought.

The limits imposed by the nature of the series, while permitting a more extended discussion than was possible in a course of six lectures, yet forbade aught but a summary treatment of a few representative topics, and even these, I am well aware, are presented in an all too fragmentary and incomplete fashion. But, in spite of its limitations, it is hoped that the book may serve its purpose, not as a history of modern religious

-ix-

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The Rise of Modern Religious Ideas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editorial Note vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • Book I - Disintegration 1
  • Chapter II - The Enlightenment 11
  • Chapter III - Natural Science 24
  • Chapter IV - The Critical Philosophy 45
  • Book II - Reconstruction 61
  • Chapter VI - The Rebirth of Speculation 81
  • Chapter VII - The Rehabilitation of Faith 104
  • Chapter VIII - Agnosticism 144
  • Chapter IX - Evolution 166
  • Chapter X - Divine Immanence 187
  • Chapter XI - Ethical Theism 222
  • Chapter XII - The Character of God. 240
  • Chapter XIII The Social Emphasis 254
  • Chapter XIV - Religious Authority 279
  • Index 311
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