Decentralizing Urban Policy: Case Studies in Community Development

By Paul R. Dommel; John Stuart Hall et al. | Go to book overview

by-case basis and most recipients are on some form of public assistance. The program was essential for humanitarian reasons but probably will make no long-term difference in the lives of the recipients or the appearance of the neighborhoods. Housing and redevelopment activities are often justified by theories asserting the beneficial long-run effects of improved residential environment on individual and group behavior. According to such theories, peoples' feelings about themselves should be improved along with the environment, resulting in multiplier effects that will eventually pay social, psychological, and economic benefits to the community. Even if the theory is strongly supported and even if housing intervention of this type produces significant social and economic benefits, long-range community improvement objectives may prove difficult to reach owing to the insufficient size of the treatment relative to the scale of the problem. Substantial concentrations of poverty and poor housing exist in Phoenix. It is apparent from indicators such as overcrowding, excessive rent payments, and structural defects that between 17,000 and 25,000 households suffer from multiple problems of poverty, including inadequate housing. Even if the RRPP and neighborhood development program were completed and functioning perfectly, they would be directly treating fewer than 1,000 households in small corners of two census tracts.


Conclusion

Community development goals in Phoenix, indeed the definition of community development, shifted as the program progressed. There was no community development program, per se, in the first two years. The activities described on the CDBG applications were coordinated only at the application stage. After the applications were approved, the funds and implementation responsibility were distributed among the city's Housing Services Division, the Parks Department, the Booker T. Washington project, and the Streets and Engineering departments. Community development activity was centralized only for budget and reporting purposes. Except for informal communication among affected employees, different departments had little way of knowing about progress or lack of it toward the vague overall community development goals stated in the application.

The city's relative youth and inexperience with urban development

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Decentralizing Urban Policy: Case Studies in Community Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Legislating and Implementing a Block Grant 13
  • Conclusion 45
  • Chapter Three - Phoenix, Arizona 47
  • Conclusion 79
  • Chapter Four - Houston, Texas 84
  • Chapter Five - Chicago, Illinois 120
  • Chapter Seven - Carbondale, Illinois 195
  • Conclusion 220
  • Chapter Eight the Process and Its Outcomes 223
  • Conclusion 240
  • Chapter Nine Decentralization: A Moving Target 243
  • Index 265
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.