Franco-Spanish Rivalry in North America, 1524-1763

By Henry D. Folmer | Go to book overview

Iberville Rediscovers the Mississippi

These people [the Spaniards at Pensacola] fear everyone, they
have few soldiers, and if we had received orders to dislodge
them, it would have been very easy
.1

La Salle had perished in his attempt to make a settlement close to the Spanish silver mines, most of his followers who had not died of disease had either been killed by the Indians or had been taken prisoner by the Spaniards. Only a few had been able to make their way back to France. Yet La Salle's ideas did not die with him, either in America or in France.

In 1694 Henri Tonti proposed to resume La Salle's project. Writing from Montreal, Tonti repeated La Salle's old arguments in favor of a settlement close to the Spaniards. The first result of such a settlement, according to Tonti, would be that "His Majesty would have a fort in Mexico, from where he will much disturb the Spaniards."2 Another important argument in the eyes of Tonti was that French occupation of the Gulf coast would prevent the English from occupying it. Tonti believed that Canada would be lost if the English succeeded in controlling the mouth of the Mississippi.

In 1697, two Canadian officers, Captain La Porte de Louvigny and Lieutenant Ailleboust de Mantet, presented a petition to the minister of the navy, Count

____________________
1
Chasteaumorant to Pontchartrain, June 23, 1699, Margry, IV, 109.
2
Tonti to Cabart de Villermont, September 11, 1694, ibid., p. 4.

-197-

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Franco-Spanish Rivalry in North America, 1524-1763
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 5
  • Contents 9
  • Illustrations 11
  • Preface 13
  • Abbreviations Used in the Footnotes 17
  • Spain's Claim to the New World 19
  • France Sails the Ocean 31
  • France Challenges Spanish Claims 43
  • Peace in Europe but War in America 63
  • Pedro Menendez D'Aviles and the End of the Huguenot Colony 91
  • Sixteenth Century Justice 117
  • The Gulf of Mexico 125
  • Penalosa and La Salle 137
  • The Mississippi and the Rio Grande 145
  • La Salle's Expedition of 1684 155
  • The Spaniards and La Salle 167
  • Ruins and Survivors of Fort St. Louis 177
  • Iberville Rediscovers the Mississippi 197
  • The Beginnings of Louisiana 209
  • Mobile and Pensacola 219
  • The French Expand into Texas 1717-1719 241
  • Pensacola and the War of the Quadruple Alliance 253
  • Texas During and After the War of the Quadruple Alliance 265
  • French Efforts to Penetrate New Mexico 277
  • The Last Years of Rivalry, 1727-1763 291
  • Bibliography 311
  • Index 335
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