The Imagination of Disaster: Evil in the Fiction of Henry James

By J. A. Ward | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FOUR
Evil and the Major Phase

WHEN, in the first years of the twentieth century, James again took up the international theme, he used the same broad situation that had served him in the eighteen-seventies and eighties--the conflict of America and Europe against a European background. However, he so radically altered his treatment that his late international fiction must be considered not so much an extension of the earlier work as a distinct category. After the tightly restricted settings and unheroic protagonists of James's London novels, the international settings and international heroes of The Ambassadors, The Wings of the Dove, and The Golden Bowl significantly extend the scope of James's fiction. In the London fiction James was limited by subject matter and theme. The cramped Londoners with minor ambitions and, by comparison, petty problems, stand for man at his least heroic. The international theme offered James the setting for large-scale conflicts and characters of heroic dimensions.

Yet the novels of James's major phase are not so pointedly international as those of his earlier period. Not only do they contain little satire of American Puritanism and Philistinism, but also they stress moral rather than cultural differences.1 It is significant, for example, that James planned The Wings of the Dove as a purely English novel.2 Yet to provide his heroine with a moral strength that he found lacking in the English woman, he made Milly Theale an American. While Fleda Vetch and Nanda Brookenham are like the American heroines in their innocence and moral sense, they differ strikingly in being weak and unattractive. James looked to America to supply his heroines of stature, to complement morality with strength of character.

-102-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Imagination of Disaster: Evil in the Fiction of Henry James
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter One - the Consciousness of Evil 3
  • Chapter Two - Evil and the International Theme 18
  • Chapter Three - Evil in London 56
  • Chapter Four - Evil and the Major Phase 102
  • Chapter Five - the Last Tales: the Appalled Appalling 157
  • Conclusion 168
  • Notes 172
  • Index 183
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 185

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.