Indian Languages of Mexico and Central America and Their Geographical Distribution

By Cyrus Thomas | Go to book overview

MEXICO

COCOPA
(Synonym: Cucapa)

The Indians speaking this idiom are generally placed in the Yuman family, and, according to Orozco y Berra, are sometimes referred to by the names Cuhanes, Cuanes, and Yuanes. The name given on his map is Cuhanes. Unfortunately, however, he has made two tribes of them, one (Cucapas, or Cuhanes) which he places in the Yuman family; the other (Cocopas) in the Piman family. Doctor Gatschet (415)1 makes the two names synonyms and places the one tribe in the Yuman family. However, the relations of the tribe have not yet been satisfactorily worked out. These Indians live along the Colorado river near its mouth.


COCHIMI

The Cochimi were a division of the Yuman family living in the northern portions of the Californian peninsula. Their territory extended from the international boundary southward to, or a little beyond, the twenty-sixth parallel of north latitude, including Loreto, where it was bounded by the territory of the Waïcuri ( Bancroft, I, 557). Orozco y Berra says (1:366): "Los Cochimíes ocupaban la peninsula desde Loreto hasta poco mas allá de nuestra frontera." Venegas ( I, 66) says: "Desde el territorio de Loreto, por todo lo descubierto al Norte de la nacion Cochimi;" Clavigero (22) says from 25° to 33° north latitude.

The Cochimi spoke a distinct language of the Yuman stock, divided, however, into from two to four dialects. Orozco y Berra, in his text (1: 366-367), mentions three, Cochimi del Norte, Edu, and Didu, but on his map he adds what seems to be a fourth, Cochimi (proper). He is evidently in error in referring to the Edu and Didu here, since they were Waïcurian and were situated considerably farther south. The northern Cochimi are mentioned by some authors as the Laymon. Prichard ( II, 553) mentions "The Cochimi, Pericu, and Loretto languages; the former is the same as the Laymon, for the Laymones are the northern Cochimies." Hassel (57) mentions Laymon as distinct, and the Cochimi with three distinct dialects--San Francisco Borgia, Utschiti, and Ika. Bancroft ( III, 687) mentions but two dialects of the Cochimi in his text--Lay- mon and Ika. It is questionable, however, whether the Ika were not Waïcurian.

In spite of Orozco y Berra's error in placing the Didu and Edu, the territory assigned by him to the Yuman stock agrees with the information of our best early authorities, and he has been followed in the accompanying map.

____________________
1
See the Bibliography, pages 97-100.

-2-

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Indian Languages of Mexico and Central America and Their Geographical Distribution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page I
  • Prefatory Note III
  • Contents V
  • Indian Languages of Mexico and Central America 1
  • Mexico 2
  • Ethnic Dividing Line Between North America And South America 61
  • Bibliography 97
  • Index of Linguistic Families, Tribes, and Settlements 101
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