The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes

By Arthur Conan Doyle; W. W. Robson | Go to book overview

The Blanched Soldier*

THE ideas of my friend Watson, though limited, are exceedingly pertinacious. For a long time he has worried me to write an experience of my own. Perhaps I have rather invited this persecution, since I have often had occasion to point out to him how superficial are his own accounts and to accuse him of pandering to popular taste instead of confining himself rigidly to fact and figures. 'Try it yourself, Holmes!' he has retorted, and I am compelled to admit that, having taken my pen in my hand, I do begin to realize that the matter must be presented in such a way as may interest the reader. The following case can hardly fail to do so, as it is among the strangest happenings in my collection, though it chanced that Watson had no note of it in his collection. Speaking of my old friend and biographer, I would take this opportunity to remark that if I burden myself with a companion in my various little inquiries it is not done out of sentiment or caprice, but it is that Watson has some remarkable characteristics of his own, to which in his modesty he has given small attention amid his exaggerated estimates of my own performances. A confederate who foresees your conclusions and course of action is always dangerous, but one to whom each development comes as a perpetual surprise, and to whom the future is always a closed book, is, indeed, an ideal helpmate.

I find from my notebook that it was in January 1903, just after the conclusion of the Boer War,* that I had my visit from Mr James M. Dodd, a big, fresh, sunburned, upstanding Briton. The good Watson had at that time deserted me for a wife,* the only selfish action which I can recall in our association. I was alone.

It is my habit to sit with my back to the window and to place my visitors in the opposite chair, where the light falls full upon them. Mr James M. Dodd seemed somewhat at a

-151-

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The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • General Editor's Preface to the Series vii
  • Introduction xi
  • Note on the Text xxxii
  • Select Bibliography xxxiii
  • A Chronology of Arthur Conan Doyle xxxix
  • Preface 3
  • The Mazarin Stone 5
  • Thor Bridge 23
  • The Creeping Man 50
  • The Sussex Vampire 72
  • The Three Garridebs 89
  • The Illustrious Client 106
  • The Three Gables 133
  • The Blanched Soldier 151
  • The Lion's Mane 172
  • The Retired Colourman 192
  • The Veiled Lodger 208
  • Shoscombe Old Place 220
  • Explanatory Notes 238
  • Appendix - A Source for 'the Veiled Lodger' the Love-Ly Tam-Er, the Cru-El Li-Ons, and the Clev-Er Clown A Tale for the Lit-Tle Ones 290
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