A Critical Difference: T. S. Eliot and John Middleton Murry in English Literary Criticism, 1919-1928

By David Goldie | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

In the course of writing this book I've had the good fortune to meet a number of people whose help, both academic and personal, I am very pleased to be able to acknowledge. Jon Stallworthy, David Bradshaw, and Jon Mee in Oxford, and Stephen Baker and Andrew Noble in Glasgow, have been extremely generous with their time and ideas, and have influenced this work in ways they might not even realize. Bernard Bergonzi, Howard Brown, Robert Crawford, Denis Flannery, Saul Frampton, Donald Fraser, Lyndall Gordon, Menno Lievers, Mark Sims, and Marcus and Sarah Wood have at various stages provided vital assistance and support. The staff of a number of libraries are also due my sincere thanks, in particular Mr J. V. Howard, Librarian, Special Collections, Edinburgh University Library; Sandra Bailey, Librarian, Wadham College Library, Oxford; Vera Ryhajlo, Tina King, and Helen Rogers of the Upper Reserve in the Bodleian Library; Eamon Dyas, Group Records Manager at News International; the staff of the Mitchell Library, Glasgow and of the City University Library, London. I am grateful to Mrs Valerie Eliot and Faber & Faber Ltd. for permission to quote from uncollected and unpublished work by T. S. Eliot, and to the Society of Authors, as the Literary Representative of the Estate of John Middleton Murry, to quote from published and unpublished material by John Middleton Murry. I am grateful, too, to the Department of English Studies at the University of Strathclyde for some crucial financial assistance in the latter stages of my research.

The people who deserve the greatest thanks, though, are those who are closest. My parents, Jean and David Goldie, have been unstinting in their support throughout and Christine Green has, in her unfailing and sometimes unappreciated help, disproved all the jokes I have ever heard about mothers-in-law. The person to whom most is owed, however, is Debbie Goldie. She has, along with our daughters Christina Goldie and Katie Goldie, provided the base on which all of what follows has been built.

D. G.

-vii-

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A Critical Difference: T. S. Eliot and John Middleton Murry in English Literary Criticism, 1919-1928
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford English Monographs i
  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • I - Reconstruction: Murry, Eliot, and the Athenaeum, 1919-1921 12
  • 2 - The Criterion Versus the Adelphi, 1922-1925 69
  • 3 - Orthodoxy and Modernism the Claims of Religion, 1926-1928 128
  • Select Bibliography 197
  • Index 211
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