Three French Moralists and the Gallantry of France

By Edmund M. Gosse | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE
THE writings of La Rochefoucauld were subjected to accurate and detailed examination in the edition begun by Gilbert in 1868, and brought to a pause at his untimely death in 1870. It was completed in 1883 by J. Gourdault. After the lapse of half a century, the short biography by Gilbert, with which this edition began, naturally requires some revision, and is open to several additions. An earlier volume ( 1863), by E. de Barthélemy, is of a more technical character, but may be referred to with advantage by those curious regarding detail. The MSS. of Rochefoucauld still in existence -- one of these, known as the Liancourt MS., is in the Duke's handwriting -- are numerous, and may still, no doubt, reward investigation. The best recent summary is that by J. Bourdeau ( 1895), published in M. Jusserand's charming series. There is not, so far as I am aware, any English biography of the author of the "Maximes."The complete works of La Bruyère were elaborately edited in three volumes ( 1865-1878) by G. Servois. Much curious information is to be found in Allaire "La Bruyère dans la Maison de Condé" ( 1887), and an excellent summary in the Life by M. Paul Morillot, 1904. But the latest and fullest account of La Bruyère's career is to be found in M. Emile Magne's Preface to the selected works ( 1914). Editions of "Les Caractères" are countless.The writings of Vauvenargues were collected by the Marquis de Portia in 1797, by Suard in 1806, by Briére in 1821, by Gilbert in 1857, and again in 1874; each of these editions added considerably to knowledge. The only recent Life is that by M. Maurice Paléologue ( 1890).The principal volumes referred to in "The Gallantry of France" are the following: --
"Ma Pièce". Souvenir d'un canonnier de 1914. Par Paul Lintier . Paris: Librairie Plon, 1916.
"Anthologie des Écrivains français morts pour la Patrie". Par Carlos Larronde. Préface de Maurice Barrès. I-IV. Paris: Larousse. 1916-1917.

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Three French Moralists and the Gallantry of France
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • To Lord Ribblesdale v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • La Rochefoucauld 1
  • The Gallantry of France 133
  • Bibliographical Note 169
  • Index 171
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