Professional Problems in Psychology

By Robert S. Daniel; C. M. Louttit | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
An Orientation in the Profession of Psychology

Every fall hundreds of students enter graduate schools to begin advanced professional education in psychology. Each one of these students has been admitted only after careful selection. If we pick any student at random, it is very probable that we will find he has made a fine record in a first-rate liberal arts college with a good background in the sciences, social sciences, and mathematics. He has had excellent recommendations from responsible persons who know him well. He has, perhaps, also demonstrated outstanding skill at passing tests selected by the staff with which he now begins more serious study. In short, he is known as a typical bright graduate student.

This book is, first of all, for each one of these young graduate students. Its purpose is to aid him in the four-year (plus or minus one year) metamorphosis from student to professional. He will find it to be a book less about psychology than about psychologists; not concerned with the understanding of behavior, but rather with problems of persons who go about the business of attempting a scientific understanding of human behavior; not, to be sure, all of their problems as human beings, but more particularly those problems encountered in their peculiar and ofttimes frustrating efforts of enquiry.

Graduate training for our student of psychology is planned, quite properly, to emphasize the scientific nature of the field. He will find that great importance is placed upon familiarization with experimental design, statistical analyses, theory construction, behavior laws, psychodiagnosis, psychotherapy, psychophysics, and psychodynamics. In his years as a neophyte psychologist he comes to have an intimate familiarity with color shock, test validity, sign-gestalt,

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