Professional Problems in Psychology

By Robert S. Daniel; C. M. Louttit | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Library Problems and Classification

In the two preceding chapters we have discussed certain problems concerned with the literature of psychology and have attempted to describe methods for facilitating the use of this literature. For most books and journals needed, the student will turn to the university library, although for some subjects he may have considerable literature in his own possession. Using a library or maintaining one's own collection involves certain skills which are of inestimable value in facilitating the searching of literature. The operation of even a modest college library involves a considerable number of technical processes about which we cannot be concerned but without which it would be impossible for the user to secure the material he desires promptly. Our interest must be limited to those aspects of the library with which the graduate student is likely to come into contact.

Although university libraries differ in the details of their procedures, the basic plans are sufficiently similar to make transfer of training a simple matter. The student should early become familiar with the arrangement of his particular library. He should learn its system of classification and how books are arranged within that classification in the stacks and special rooms of that library. Such operating questions as permission to use the stacks, methods of procuring a book at the circulation desk, methods of checking out books from the stacks, and the use of special study rooms vary from library to library and must be determined for each particular one. However, library catalogs follow a rather constant pattern, and systems of bibliographic classification in common use are fairly standard. In addition to its own book and general collections, libraries offer other services frequently of value to the person doing research. In the following pages we shall undertake to explain the standard type of library catalog, to describe the two most frequently used general

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