16
THE SENATE MAN

It might almost be said that the institution of the United States Senate had been created for Robert A. Taft, or men like him, and he for it. Without it he could not have been the man he was; without him it will not soon be the same again. For here was a perfect meeting between a great parliamentarian and what, in one man's view at least, is the greatest parliamentary body the world has known.

The American parliament is a vastly different thing from the British one and Taft was of course a vastly different man from Winston Churchill; nevertheless he bestrode the one as surely as Churchill bestrode the other. They were, each in his very separate way, the two outstanding parliamentary men of their generation; the shy, dry solitary Taft, with his embodiment of so much of the Puritan tradition, and the grandly bibulous Churchill with his embodiment of so much of the Cavalier tradition. It is not surprising that they found so many things on which to disagree.

Though for fifteen years Taft moved in and out of a position of a relative, and at best a never decisive, power in the United States and in the Republican party, his influence on the American Congress within those years was matchless. The very qualities that always denied him success in national

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Taft Story
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents *
  • I. the Fundamental Taft 1
  • 1 - Cincinnati Dynasty 3
  • 2 - Taft and Integrity 16
  • 3 - The Background of Shelter 28
  • 4 - Taft and the Constitution 41
  • Ii. Taft in Responsibility and Irresponsibility 53
  • 5 - Onset of the Power and the Glory 55
  • 6 - Taft-Hartley, the Masterwork 66
  • 7 - The Sad, Worst Period 80
  • 8 - Return from Ohio 93
  • 9 - Taft and the Two Gop's 106
  • 10 - Crisis of 1948 116
  • Iii. Taft and Foreign Policy 129
  • 11 - The Last Speech 131
  • 12 - On War and Peace 143
  • 13 - "Soft" in Europe; "Hard" in Asia 156
  • Iv. the Last, Best Taft 169
  • 14 - The Defeat That Led to the Victory 171
  • 15 - Morningside "Surrender" 184
  • 16 - The Senate Man 195
  • 17 - The New Alliance 206
  • 18 - To Make the Administration Work 218
  • 19 - Clean Bill for Bohlen 230
  • 20 - The "Prime Minister" at His Peak 242
  • 21 - The Political Last Testament 253
  • 22 - The Illness and the Death 263
  • Postscript and Now, the Future 273
  • Index 283
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.