Shadow of the Third Century, a Revaluation of Christianity

By Alvin Boyd Kuhn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIX
THEN IS OUR FAITH VAIN

The purpose of this work is to present evidence that the religion known as Christianity was based on fallacious foundations and then to trace the disastrous consequences of a faith so wrongly based. The material of the present chapter must be considered surely as constituting one of the most devastating exhibits of that evidence in the entire field. To the ordinary intelligent Christian devotee, with a mind resting confidently on the assurances provided in never-failing volume and certitude by the priests of orthodoxy, the data here adduced to undermine the historical authenticity and credibility of the resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth must come as indeed a most shattering explosion of the proverbial bombshell. For, as Paul says and theologians have seconded, the one final axis of support on which Christianity rests is the physical resurrection of the crucified Galilean from his hillside grave.

Of course, if the over-all contention is either admitted or demonstrated past controversy (as we claim it is) that the Gospels are what the vast body of evidence now flowing in from Egyptian research proves them to be, it is a labor of supererogation to disprove the historical authenticity of any "event" in the entire Gospel narrative, or in the "life" of Jesus. If he did not live at all, all such "events" are interdicted as history.

But the presentation now to be made of material pertaining to the alleged bodily resurrection of Jesus will be made on the basis of the assumed actuality of the man's existence. The matter can not be argued on any other basis. The point to be established is that even if he lived, his resurrection can by no means be accepted as having occurred in the way that common belief asserts that it did. Again it must be remarked that the testimony of a few scholars here presented can be only a minor fraction of what could be collated. Indeed it may not even be

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