Shadow of the Third Century, a Revaluation of Christianity

By Alvin Boyd Kuhn | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XXI
PRAYER AND HEALING

Reserved for the end of the study are two aspects of Christian in- culcation that have been perhaps the two chief elements of influence by which the maudlin religion of Christianism has maintained its grip on the Occidental mind for ages. Much of what has been presented here is of more immediate interest to theologians than to the common man. But these two items now to be considered do touch the general life very closely. So strong indeed is their influence that their critique here expounded will have close to epochal value if it be found based on truth and sound reason.

First to be scanned is the great religious ritual practice which in a variety of forms falls under the general designation of prayer.

It must be prefaced that by no means is prayer a distinctively Christian formulary. With likely truth it can be said that all religions have used and exalted prayer as an integral element in their systems. Indeed prayer is hardly even to be limited to religion as an interest disparate from secular life. It may be said to be a common or universal human resort or psychological expression. It comes out as a natural and spontaneous manifestation of man's sense of his relation of dependence upon the force or forces rated as beneficent that order the life of the cosmos. So long as man conceives his life to be the responsible concern of a Power greater than himself, a view that the general course of his experience constrains him to take, he is impelled by the strenuosity of conditions at times to cry aloud to this Power for aid, consolation, succor. It is but natural that man the creature should be moved by the impulse to seek communion with the Power conceived to be his Parent. It is understandable that God's earthly children should be moved to carry to this King of Life their deepest desires, cares and woes. The natural involvements of man's situation constrain him to turn in varied degrees of realistic earnestness to this source of blessedness.

It is therefore not of prayer as distinctly a Christian usage, but rather

-467-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shadow of the Third Century, a Revaluation of Christianity
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 525

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.