A Survey of Polish Literature and Culture

By Manfred Kridl; Olga Scherer-Virski | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI
AFTER THE PARTITIONS: CLASSICISM AND PRE-ROMANTICISM

The tragic feature of the partitions of Poland was the fact that the state ceased to exist at a moment when Polish society was beginning to undergo a rapid spiritual and moral regeneration. Thirty years of intensive work during the Stanislavian Period had accomplished a great deal. If Poland had been given the opportunity of continuing that work undisturbed for a few more decades, she would certainly have gained a sound basis for a complete political and social renaissance. Unfortunately, internal weakness as well as external aggression made this impossible. We emphasize 'external aggression,' for this was at least as much a cause of the downfall as was internal anarchy. It would not have been easy for even a strong and economically well organized state to resist the joint aggression of three such mighty, imperialistic, and unscrupulous powers as were allied against Poland.

It was a fortunate fact in this tragedy, however, that the catastrophe of the partitions occurred during the Stanislavian Period, after an era of broadly conceived reforms, the awakening of the national and social consciousness, and after the Constitution of the Third of May. It was only then that the value and significance of the Stanislavian Period, not only for the last years of the Republic but also for the entire further course of Polish history, was realized fully.

This epoch had awakened in the nation a moral and spiritual force which provided the basis and outline for a program of action. This program consisted of a few basic points: the regaining of political independence, the organization of the state along the lines indicated by the Constitution of the Third of May (with, of course, the necessary supplements that the creators of the Constitution could not introduce), alliance with all peoples struggling for freedom, and the maintenance of the patriotic idea on a universal level rather than within the frame of

-192-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Survey of Polish Literature and Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 525

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.