Party Politics and Decolonization: The Conservative Party and British Colonial Policy in Tropical Africa, 1951-1964

By Philip N. Murphy | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I should like to begin by thanking Sir Patrick Wall, Sir John Tilney, the late Harold Soref, Lord Alport, Humphry Berkeley, Sir Nigel Fisher, and James Lemkin for sharing with me their memories of the period considered below. I am particularly grateful to Sir Patrick Wall for allowing me to quote at length from his letters to Sir Roy Welensky. I am indebted to Alistair Cooke for permission to quote from the papers of the Conservative party, to Lady Welensky for permission to quote from the Welensky papers, and to Lady Biggs-Davison for allowing me access to the papers of her late husband. Thanks too to Mrs Joy Jenkinson and the Rt. Hon. J. Enoch Powell for other copyright permissions and to the late Michael Blundell for allowing me to consult his papers. Acknowledgement is also due to the Public Record Office for permission to quote from a variety of departmental papers.

The staff of the Bodleian Library's Department of Western Manuscripts gave me invaluable help and support throughout the production of this work. My particular thanks to Colin Harris and Sarah Street. The staff at Rhodes House, likewise, were tremendously helpful. The former Librarian Alan Bell and the archivist of the Welensky papers James Hargrave deserve special thanks. I am also grateful to the staff of the House of Lords Record Office, the archives of Churchill College, Cambridge, the Modern Records Centre of the University of Warwick, and the Borthwick Institute at York University.

The initial research on which this book is based was financed by a studentship from the British Academy. Many friends and colleagues contributed to the completion of this work if only by impressing upon me its relative unimportance. I cannot list them here without running the risk of leaving out a crucial name. It would be impossible, however, to fail to single out Georgia Kaufmann, and, indeed, she would expect no less. My parents provided every kind of support and were remarkably tolerant. Final word must go to A. H. M. Kirk-Greene, who provided the benign guiding force behind this book from beginning to end. He acted, as Sir

-vii-

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