Party Politics and Decolonization: The Conservative Party and British Colonial Policy in Tropical Africa, 1951-1964

By Philip N. Murphy | Go to book overview

5
Central Office Involvement in Colonial Policy

Party Discipline and the Management of Information

Chapters 3 and 4 have described the activities of interest groups which competed to influence opinion within the Conservative party. Businessmen and European settlers featured large among the often very limited set of intermediaries from whom Conservative politicians could obtain information on Africa. During the majority of the Conservatives' thirteen years in power from 1951 settler and business influence did not pose serious problems for party unity. Even in Kenya, where the government expected major opposition, they managed to forge a working partnership with moderate settlers and businessmen which in turn carried the Conservative party through some of the crucial stages of constitutional reform. Central Africa proved more of a problem. Not only did the Federal government initiate a sophisticated public relations campaign aimed at encouraging dissent within the party, but also many Conservative elder statesmen to whom Tory back-benchers looked for guidance were openly critical of the government over its dealings with the Federation. Under these circumstances, it was essential for party unity that Conservative MPs be provided with a regular supply of information which both explained and justified the government's handling of African affairs. This chapter considers the ways in which the Conservative party organization attempted to influence reactions to government policy in colonial Africa and, in a more peripheral way, how it helped to shape and implement that policy.

The management of parliamentary opinion was of concern not only to party leaders but also to civil servants. Officials in Whitehall were keen to preserve the façade of bipartisan agreement over colonial policy. Yet they could not enlist the assistance of Conservative party workers in the presentation of government policy without straying into a grey zone of British constitutional practice. In his memoirs, Macmillan stated:

The functions of the Government machine must be scrupulously kept separate from those of Party interests.1
____________________
1
Harold Macmillan Memoirs, v. Pointing the Way ( 1972), 4.

-120-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Party Politics and Decolonization: The Conservative Party and British Colonial Policy in Tropical Africa, 1951-1964
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 259

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.