Party Politics and Decolonization: The Conservative Party and British Colonial Policy in Tropical Africa, 1951-1964

By Philip N. Murphy | Go to book overview

7
Conservative Reactions to Rapid Decolonization in East and Central Africa

Any attempt to chart shifts in opinion among Tory back-benchers is hampered by the uneven quality of the information available and by the party's concern to minimize public manifestations of dissent. Very little evidence exists within the Conservative party archives regarding two important indicators of back-bench opinion: the activities of the Whips and the views expressed at meetings of the 1922 Committee. Occasionally the gaps can be filled by 'leaks' of various kinds but these generally deserve to be treated with some caution. If parliamentary debates provide an indication of the concerns of individual Tory MPs, figures from the division lobbies say very little about the strength of feeling within the party. Macleod noted in August 1961 that the so-called split in the party over African affairs had not resulted in Tory MPs either abstaining or voting against the government in debates on colonial policy.1 Indeed, from 1959 to 1964 there were only seven major rebellions against the government on two- or three-line whips (involving 5 per cent or more of Conservative back-benchers) and none of these related to colonial affairs.2 Party discipline tended to discourage Conservative MPs from opposing their front bench in the division lobbies: rebels risked not only damaging their chances of promotion but also losing the confidence of their constituency parties. There were, however, other more acceptable ways in which back-benchers could register their views. They could table parliamentary questions, sponsor private members' bills, and propose amendments to government legislation which even if not debated might attract the signatures of other back-benchers of the same mind. They could also table Early Day Motions, resolutions which were rarely

____________________
1
Yorkshire Post, 15 Aug. 1961.
2
John E. Schwartz and Geoffrey Lambert, "Career Objectives, Group Feelings and Legislative Party Cohesion: The British Conservatives, 1959-1968", Journal of Politics, 33 ( 1971), 406-7.

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Party Politics and Decolonization: The Conservative Party and British Colonial Policy in Tropical Africa, 1951-1964
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 259

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.