Motivation: Theory and Research

By Harold F. O'Neil Jr.; Michael Drillings | Go to book overview

1
Introduction to Motivation: Theory and Research

Michael Drillings

Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences

Harold F. O'Neil Jr.

University of Southern California/CRESST

There are several well-documented trends that will affect education and training now and in the future: introduction of large numbers of immigrants into the United States; a reduction in the 17-20 year-old group between 1980 and 1996; an increased participation rate by women and minorities in the labor force; increasing use of English as a second language; increased requirements for second language learning; and a possible increased use of robotics to accomplish unskilled jobs ( Johnston & Packer, 1987; O'Neil, Allred, U+)026 Baker, 1992). Further, several issues specific to the Armed Forces also magnify these general trends for Department of Defense education and training. These issues include reduction in force structure, reduction in manpower and personnel, decreasing budgets for training, increasing equipment complexity, and increased use of the Reserves (Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense, 1992; National Research Council, 1992).

Thus, students will have to master an increased variety of complicated subject material, to master an increased set of sophisticated skills, and to perform these skills at higher standards in ever-changing contexts. We expect that these trends will continue well into the 21st century for both the military and civilian sectors.


A FRAMEWORK FOR MOTIVATION

The great majority of education and training research and development is focused on the cognitive dimensions of learning, for instance, the acquisition and retention of declarative and procedural knowledge. Less attention has been given in the literature and in the design of education and training itself to motivational

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Motivation: Theory and Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 332

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.