Africans Abroad: A Documentary History of the Black Diaspora in Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean during the Age of Slavery

By Graham W. Irwin | Go to book overview

AFRICANS IN CHINA

FOR MORE than a thousand years, from about the fourth century A.D. to the eighteenth, African slaves were imported into China. Most were supplied by professional Arab traders, who established an entrepôt for the purpose at Canton as early as 300 A.D., and most arrived by sea, either directly from the Middle East and the East African coast, or via mainland Southeast Asia and the islands. In 1382, for example, "101 male and female Negroes," who presumably had been transported from Africa to Indonesia at some earlier time, were sent to an emperor of the Ming dynasty as tribute from Java. 88 In the medieval period a few African slaves also entered China overland. Traded eastward along the Central Asian caravan routes, they can have formed only a small fraction of the hordes of slaves-- Turkic, Tibetan, and Iranian--being imported into China from inner Asia at that time. 89

It is impossible to estimate how many Africans were enslaved in China in historic times, since no statistics, of even the most approximate kind, are available. The total number, in any case, cannot have been large. Unlike India (to say nothing of the Middle East or the Americas), China today does not possess even a remnant population of Africans or persons of African descent to bear witness to past influxes of blacks. Yet, if the number of Africans who entered China

-168-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Africans Abroad: A Documentary History of the Black Diaspora in Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean during the Age of Slavery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction - Africa and the Ancient World 1
  • Egypt 3
  • Ethiopia 16
  • Africans in Classical Antiquity 25
  • Part One Africans in Asia 37
  • The Middle East Before Islam 39
  • Blacks in the Islamic World 57
  • The Revolt of the Zanj 73
  • Muslim Attitudes Toward Africa and Africans 108
  • Africans in India 137
  • Africans in China 168
  • Part Two: Africans in Latin America and the Caribbean 177
  • The Experience of Slavery 185
  • Maroons 283
  • Revolts 322
  • Free Blacks 352
  • Notes 383
  • For Further Reading 391
  • Index 401
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 408

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.