Africans Abroad: A Documentary History of the Black Diaspora in Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean during the Age of Slavery

By Graham W. Irwin | Go to book overview

THE EXPERIENCE OF SLAVERY

BETWEEN THE sixteenth and the nineteenth centuries three main types of society evolved in the New World. There was the society of the highlands of Central and South America, found typically in Mexico and Peru, which consisted of a small number of whites engaged in pastoralism, agriculture, and mining, and controlling a largely Amerindian laboring population. There was the white settler society of the temperate zones, that is, most of North America, and Argentina and Chile; here the few indigenous inhabitants were quickly killed off or driven away, enabling an Old World society to be re-created in the New. Finally, there was the society of the tropical and subtropical regions of the West Indies and lowland Central and northern South America. In these areas almost all the work was done by Africans and the descendants of Africans under a system of slave labor. Although, as the records show, the slaves filled every conceivable type of role from classical musician to ranchhand to placer miner to storekeeper and stevedore, the predominant unit of economic production was the plantation, and it was on the plantations and in the industries associated with them that the majority of slaves lived, worked, and died.

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Africans Abroad: A Documentary History of the Black Diaspora in Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean during the Age of Slavery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction - Africa and the Ancient World 1
  • Egypt 3
  • Ethiopia 16
  • Africans in Classical Antiquity 25
  • Part One Africans in Asia 37
  • The Middle East Before Islam 39
  • Blacks in the Islamic World 57
  • The Revolt of the Zanj 73
  • Muslim Attitudes Toward Africa and Africans 108
  • Africans in India 137
  • Africans in China 168
  • Part Two: Africans in Latin America and the Caribbean 177
  • The Experience of Slavery 185
  • Maroons 283
  • Revolts 322
  • Free Blacks 352
  • Notes 383
  • For Further Reading 391
  • Index 401
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