The Intellectual Origins of Egyptian Nationalism

By Jamal Mohammed Ahmed | Go to book overview

ACKNOLEDGMENTS

HAD it not been for the Wednesday afternoon sessions with Mr. A. H. Hourani during the 1952-3 scholastic year in Oxford, this book would not have been conceived. When I came to write it out as a thesis in the last two terms of the following year, Mr. Hourani was again the wise, patient, and meticulous teacher. When we met again in Baghdad last summer, we had occasion to look at it with a view to publication. Selecting the material for the book from the thesis was not an easy task, and I am grateful to Mr. Hourani for all the help and encouragement he so generously afforded me.

Ahmad Lutfi al-Sayyid's week's companionship in Alexandria in the summer of 1953 was illuminating and enjoyable. He introduced me to some of his old friends, notably Hafiz Afifi, whose wonderful memory threw many lights on events and personalities in Egypt before the First World War. Lutfi al-Sayyid also allowed me the benefit of his valuable library in his residence in Heliopolis.

When I was reading the newspapers in the Citadel at Cairo, where some of the valuable material of the Khedivial Library have been transferred since the war, I drew on the wide knowledge of Dr. Muhammad Yusif Najm of the American University of Beirut.

J. M. A.

Addis Ababa December 1959

-vi-

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The Intellectual Origins of Egyptian Nationalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknoledgments vi
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • I - Introduction 1
  • II - Islamic Liberalism 35
  • III - The Girondists of Egypt 44
  • IV - Political Parties 58
  • VI - Ahmad Lutfi Al-Sayyid 85
  • Postscript 113
  • Select Bibliography 128
  • Index 133
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