Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal

By Robert P. Ingalls | Go to book overview

accomplishments and shortcomings of the Little New Deal? Who benefited from it? What gave reform its momentum during the 1930s? What role did Herbert H. Lehman play in adoption of the Little New Deal? These are the questions this study seeks to answer through its focus on state legislation in the period 1933-42.

In the preparation of this work, I have benefited from the help and guidance of several people who deserve mention but naturally bear no responsibility for the judgments expressed herein. My greatest debt is to William E. Leuchtenburg, De Witt Clinton Professor of History at Columbia University, who first directed me to the Lehman Papers and subsequently gave unfailing advice and encouragement during the completion of this study. His careful readings at every stage not only strengthened the analysis but also improved the style. The Curator of the Lehman Papers, William B. Liebmann, immensely facilitated the research for this project through his knowledge of Herbert Lehman and his determination to make archives serve the student of history. His friendship and enthusiasm helped me in countless ways. Thomas McDaid, Assistant Curator of the Lehman Papers, generously offered suggestions which aided me at a number of points. My wife, Joèle, will probably never fully realize the importance of her contribution, but above all, she shared the burden, as well as the joy, involved in researching and writing this work. Finally, I would like to emphasize that the dedication to George H. Mayer is but a small expression of my gratitude to the man who first sparked my interest in history and then encouraged me to pursue that interest.


NOTES
1.
Richard S. Kirkendall, "The New Deal as Watershed: The Recent. Literature," Journal of American History, LIV ( March 1968): 852.
2.
For reviews of the New Deal literature, see ibid., and Richard S. Kirkendall, "The Great Depression: Another Watershed in American History?" in Change and Continuity in Twentieth-Century America, ed. by John Braeman et al. ( Columbus, Ohio, 1964) pp. 145-90.
3.
George H. Mayer, The Political Career of Floyd B. Olson ( Minneapolis, 1951); Robert E. Burke , Olson's New Deal for California ( Berkeley, Calif., 1953); Richard C. Keller, "Pennsylvania's Little New Deal" (unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Columbia University, 1960).
4.
James T. Patterson, The New Deal and the States: Federalism in Transition ( Princeton, N.J., 1969), pp. 198, 202.
5.
William E. Leuchtenburg, Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal, 1932-1940 ( New York, 1963), pp. 66, 126-27, 129 et passim; Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., The Coming of the New Deal ( Cambridge, Mass., 1958), p. 115 et passim; Public Works Administration, America Builds: The Record of the PWA ( Washington, 1939), pp. 43, 136, 170-71, 226-30 et passim; "Final Report of the NYA for New York City and Long Island," p. 124, in National Youth Administration Records, Record Group 119, National Archives.

-xi-

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Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xix
  • I- from Wall Street to State Street 1
  • Notes 24
  • II- Emergency Unemployment Relief 31
  • Notes 42
  • III- From Emergency Relief to the Welfare State 48
  • Notes 66
  • IV- The Search for Security 71
  • Notes 94
  • V- Defending the Defenseless 102
  • Notes 123
  • VI- Lending Labor a Hand 131
  • VII- The Promise of Parity 148
  • Notes 172
  • VIII- The Advent of Public Housing 182
  • IX- Battling the Utilities 210
  • Notes 226
  • X- The End of an Era 231
  • Notes 244
  • Notes 255
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 275
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