Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal

By Robert P. Ingalls | Go to book overview

voters but also in the ranks of Republican lawmakers. Beginning in 1933, New York adopted a series of reforms designed specifically to aid women and child workers. Despite a temporary setback as a result of the Tipaldo decision, the state successfully offered the first guarantee of minimum wages for New Yorkers. It also initiated the gradual abolition of industrial homework, which had long produced some of the country's worst sweatshops. Although New York failed to ratify the federal child labor amendment, the state improved its own restrictions on child labor by raising the minimum school--leaving age from fourteen to sixteen. All these reforms expanded the Welfare State by guaranteeing minimum standards for the protection of particular groups in the industrial labor force.


NOTES
1.
Elinore M. Herrick, "Brief in Support of Minimum Wage Legislation," [ 1933], pp. 7-9, copy in "Wages and Hours-Standard Wage Act, New York" folder (hereinafter referred to as "Wages and Hours--SWA, NY"), National Consumers' League Papers (hereinafter referred to as NCL Papers), Library of Congress; Frances Perkins, "The Cost of a Five-Dollar Dress," Survey Graphic, XXII ( February 1933): 75-78; Rita S. Halle, "Lucky to Have a Job," Scribner's Magazine, LXLIII ( April 1933): 235-38; John T. Flynn, "Starvation Wages: The Plight of the Employed," The Forum, LXXXIX ( June 1933): 327-31.
2.
"Minutes of Conference on Breakdown of Labor Standards," January 9, 1933, pp. 2-3, "Consumers' League of New York," Reel 21, GP, HHLP.
3.
"Minutes of Meeting; What Concerned Action Can Do About It, December 1932, folder 17, Mary W. Dewson Papers, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College.
4.
Mabel Leslie to Lucy Mason, February 3,1933, "Wages and Hours--SWA, NY," NCL Papers.
5.
New York Herald Tribune, March 3, 1933, "Factual Brief for Appellant," p. 32, Morehead v. New York ex rel. Tipaldo, in U.S. Briefs, 1935 (396).
6.
Herrick, "Brief in Support of Minimum Wage Legislation," pp. 5-8; Josephine Goldmark, "The New Menace in Industry," Scribner's Magazine, LXLIII ( March 1933): 141-43.
7.
New York Times, December 16, 1950; Josephine Goldmark, Impatient Crusader: Florence Kelley's Life Story ( Urbana, Ill, 1953), pp. 82-83, 143-49; Robert H. Bremner, From the Depths: The Discovery of Poverty in the United States ( New York, 1956), pp. 232-33; Clement E. Vose, "The National Consumers' League and the Brandeis Brief," Midwest Journal of Political Science, I ( November 1957): 267-90; Muller v. Oregon, 208 U.S. 412 ( 1908).
8.
Mary W. Dewson to Isador Lubin, April 16, 1957, folder 17.1, Dewson Papers (Radcliffe).
9.
Quoted in James T. Patterson, "Mary Dewson and the American Minimum Wage Movement," Labor History, V (Spring 1964): 150.
10.
Despite a thorough survey of the problem, New York failed to enact a minimum wage law during this period. Thomas J. Kerr, IV, "The New York Factory Investigating Commission and the Minimum Wage Movement," ibid., XI (Summer 1971): 373-386.
11.
Alice S. Cheyney, "The Course of Minimum Wage Legislation in the United States," International Labor Review, XXXVIII ( July 1938): 26-27; Adkins v. Children's Hospital, 261 U.S. 525 ( 1923).

-123-

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Herbert H. Lehman and New York's Little New Deal
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • Notes xix
  • I- from Wall Street to State Street 1
  • Notes 24
  • II- Emergency Unemployment Relief 31
  • Notes 42
  • III- From Emergency Relief to the Welfare State 48
  • Notes 66
  • IV- The Search for Security 71
  • Notes 94
  • V- Defending the Defenseless 102
  • Notes 123
  • VI- Lending Labor a Hand 131
  • VII- The Promise of Parity 148
  • Notes 172
  • VIII- The Advent of Public Housing 182
  • IX- Battling the Utilities 210
  • Notes 226
  • X- The End of an Era 231
  • Notes 244
  • Notes 255
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 275
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