II. THE ILLYRIAN EMPERORS AND THEIR LAND.

THE eastern shores of the Hadriatic have in all ages borne the character of a border-land. And it is from their character as a border-land that they draw a great part of their charm, alike for him who studies their past and present history and for him who looks on their hills and islands with his own eyes. And they have been a border-land in two senses. They form the march of the two great geographical, political, and religious divisions of Europe. The two great peninsulas which the Hadriatic gulf parts asunder have a march-land which does not exactly coincide with their primary physical boundary. The north-eastern part of the eastern peninsula, that which is sometimes called the Byzantine peninsula, is closely connected, even physically, with the Italian peninsula which lies on the western side of the gulf. The mountains which part off Istria and Dalmatia from the vast mainland to the east of them are a continuation of the range of mountains which parts off Italy from the vast mainland to the north of her. It is indeed true in one sense that the heights which part off all the three great peninsulas of southern Europe are parts of one range stretching from the Pyrenees to the Balkans. But Dalmatia is bound to Italy by a closer tie than this, and Istria is bound to her by a tie closer still. Istria lies east of the Hadriatic; yet, on any theory of natural boundaries, Istria is manifestly Italian. In the case of Dalmatia the connexion is not so close and unbroken; yet the narrow, the constantly narrowing, strip of land between the mountains and the sea, though geo-

-22-

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Historical Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents xi
  • I. First Impressions of Rome. 1
  • Ii. the Illyrian Emperors and Their Land. 22
  • Diocletian's Place in Architectural History. 62
  • Iii. Augusta Treverorum. 68
  • The Panegyrists of the Fourth Century 118
  • Iv. the Goths at Ravenna. 121
  • V. Race and Language. 173
  • The Jews in Europe. 227
  • Vi. the Byzantine Empire. 231
  • Vii. First Impressions of Athens. 278
  • Viii. Mediæval and Modern Greece. 303
  • Ix. the Southern Slaves. 379
  • X. Sicilian Cycles. 428
  • Xi. the Normans at Palermo. 437
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