IX. THE SOUTHERN SLAVES.

IN a former essay the attempt was made to trace out the true meaning and the true bounds both of the doctrine of nationality and of its wider developement, the doctrine of race. It was there pointed out that the events of our own day have brought these doctrines into a prominence which they never had before, and had moreover brought them into the closest connexion with the great political changes of our time. It was further implied that the feeling of race in the modern sense, race, as we have defined it elsewhere, race, as distinguished from the narrower feeling of nationality, is chiefly confined to one of the great branches of the European family. The feeling of nationality is strong enough in other cases. That feeling has, within the last twenty years, built up two of the great powers of Europe. It has given the world an united Italy and an united Germany. And it may be as well to remember that, as the wider doctrine of race is made a matter of mockery now, so the narrower doctrine of nationality was, only a few years back, made an equal matter of mockery. We were told that an united Germany and an united Italy were mere dreams of enthusiasts, dreams which lay as far out of the range of practical politics as any dreams of Slavonic enthusiasts can lie now. But united Germany and united Italy now stand before us, not as dreams, but as facts, in the face of all Europe. The reunion of both lands was a strictly national reunion. It did not come within the range of the wider doctrine of race. Whenever the doctrine of race, as dis-

-379-

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Historical Essays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents xi
  • I. First Impressions of Rome. 1
  • Ii. the Illyrian Emperors and Their Land. 22
  • Diocletian's Place in Architectural History. 62
  • Iii. Augusta Treverorum. 68
  • The Panegyrists of the Fourth Century 118
  • Iv. the Goths at Ravenna. 121
  • V. Race and Language. 173
  • The Jews in Europe. 227
  • Vi. the Byzantine Empire. 231
  • Vii. First Impressions of Athens. 278
  • Viii. Mediæval and Modern Greece. 303
  • Ix. the Southern Slaves. 379
  • X. Sicilian Cycles. 428
  • Xi. the Normans at Palermo. 437
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