Sons of the Wild Jackass

By Ray Tucker; Frederick R. Barkley et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
"BIG JIM" COUZENS: THE "SCAB MILLIONAIRE"

"BIG JIM" COUZENS Of Michigan is the meanest and kindest member of the United States Senate.

He prefers a fight to friendship.

Although he is the only real multi-millionaire on Capitol Hill, he despises the smug attitude of the moneyed class on public questions, and he hacks their most sacred cows. He is what Will Hard called a "scab millionaire."

It was a passion for conflict as much as a desire for public service which led him into politics after he had amassed a fortune of forty million dollars as the partner of Henry Ford. Other men might have had enough of fighting from twelve years' association with the inventor, for the two "cussed" each other roundly many times a day, but not Couzens. He wanted more equal and dangerous opponents than the pure and pacifistic Henry.

Even as Street Railway Commissioner, Police Commissioner and Mayor of Detroit in an era when organized crime and corporate plundering burst upon the American scene, he could not satiate his appetite for conflict and conquest. It is doubtful if he ever will, but the Senate serves in a small way.

It seems to please him to be blunt and bitter and

-221-

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