The Limits of Judicial Power: The Supreme Court in American Politics

By William Lasser | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

WRITING IS supposed to be a lonely profession, but my experience has been precisely the opposite. Throughout the long process of writing this book, I have been helped, encouraged, educated, critiqued, and supported by literally scores of people. I am grateful to all of them but must content myself with thanking only a few explicitly.

Several of my former professors continued to give invaluable support and advice. James Q. Wilson, now of UCLA, has remained a vital source of practical wisdom, scholarly advice, and professional support. Above all, he has the rare ability to push his students to their fullest potential, and his honest evaluations of my work were always appreciated. Others who have been of great help at various points in the completion of this project include R. Shep Melnick, Harry Hirsch, Walter Dean Burnham, Louis Menand III, and Al Sumberg. I thank all of them.

Several of my colleagues at Clemson University have provided encouragement and assistance. I am especially happy to have had the friendship of William F Connelly, Jr., Susan and Bernie Duffy, Lois Duke, Leonard J. Greenspoon, John Johnson, Martin Slann, Steve Wainscott, and Dave Woodard. Charles W. Dunn was extremely helpful and supportive, not only reading and critiquing the manuscript but also making life easier in countless ways. Dean Robert A. Waller provided release time in 1986 to permit the completion of the manuscript, and I am grateful to him. Deborah Whitfield, Rita Pruitt, and Cathy Stowers have tolerated my jokes and contributed considerable support. The Clemson University Research Grants Committee provided generous financial assistance over several years.

Many other friends and colleagues should be recognized, either for providing specific assistance on the manuscript or for contributing to my education on the Court and on American politics. Among these are Louis Fisher, John Brigham, Sue Davis, Mary Thornberry, and Elder Witt.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Limits of Judicial Power: The Supreme Court in American Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • I- Introduction 1
  • II- The Dred Scott Case 9
  • III- Reconstruction and the Court 58
  • IV- The Supreme Court and the New Deal 111
  • V- The Modern Supreme Court- Crisis as Usual? 161
  • VI- Conclusion 246
  • Notes 273
  • Bibliography 312
  • Index 337
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.